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There's a requirement for me, where I have received the input from a file to an array.

For example, if the contents of array are 2,<,3 are $1, $2 and $3 respectively.

I have a string which is "2<3". I need to check the validity of the condition, if really 2 islessthan 3 or not.

How can I send the input of if() condition, if the input is a string for me?

Am recently introduced to Perl and would like to explore more.

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1  
One possibility (not necessarily a good one; it's dangerous, in general) is the eval operator. –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 22 '13 at 7:00

3 Answers 3

If your input is simple (number, operator, number), you can solve it in the following way:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict;

my $input = shift;
my ($num1, $op, $num2) = $input =~ /([0-9]+) *([<=>]) *([0-9]+)/;
if ('=' eq $op and $num1 == $num2
    or
    '<' eq $op and $num1 < $num2
    or
    '>' eq $op and $num1 > $num2) {
    print "Yes\n";
} else {
    print "No\n";
}

or shorter, using the "spaceship" operator <=>:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict;

my @operations = qw(= > <);

my $input = shift;
my ($num1, $op, $num2) = $input =~ /([0-9]+) *([<=>]) *([0-9]+)/;
if ($op eq $operations[$num1 <=> $num2]) {
    print "Yes\n";
} else {
    print "No\n";
}

If the expressions are recursive (i.e. (2+3)>(4+7)), you should study parsing. I would recommend Parse::RecDescent or Marpa::R2.

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As Jonathan Leffler said, this is dangerous. You should never run code like that. It's very dangerous.

The easiest (and most hazardous) way to do that is of course eval. See the docs that Jonathan has linked in his comment.

A safer option is to use Safe. It creates a compartment that restricts the use of syntax to very specific parts of Perl that you can define beforehand. It's what people use to e.g. make IRC bots or websites that can run Perl code. A good example for that is perlbot in #perl on freenode.

Disclaimer: PLEASE READ THE DOCS CAREFULLY! Do not just copy this stuff. Read the explanation about the opcodes!

Here's some example code.

use strict; use warnings;
use Safe;
$compartment = new Safe;
$compartment->permit(qw(:base_core));
$result = $compartment->reval(" 2 < 3 ? 1 : 0 ");
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Thanks for the useful suggestions. Since am already checking the operators before inputting, I can safely use eval(). Thanks. –  user1999315 Jan 25 '13 at 7:40

While you could do a fancy if statement, they will tend to be quite verbose, and error prone.

if ('=' eq $op and $num1 == $num2
  or
    '<' eq $op and $num1 < $num2
  or
    '>' eq $op and $num1 > $num2) {
  print "Yes\n";
} else {
  print "No\n";
}

Or (if you're careful) you can use an eval().

# check $input here
...
$input =~ s/[^=]=[^=]/==/;
if( eval $input ){ ...

Though that will have to compile every input, every time it is used.
It is also very difficult to use it safely in this manner.


Instead I would like to show you some advanced Perl hackery.

While it does use eval() it does so safely, because I control exactly what gets compiled by it.

#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict;

our %compare;
our $compare_match;
BEGIN{
  # list of simple ops
  my @ops = qw'< <= == != > >= lt le eq gt ge ne';
  for my $op (@ops){
    $compare{$op} = eval"sub{ \$_[0] $op \$_[1]}";
  }

  push @ops, '='; # for $compare_match
  $compare{'='} = $compare{'=='}; # copy sub

  # longest first
  @ops = sort { length($b) <=> length($a) } @ops;
  local $" #"
    = '|';
  $compare_match = eval"qr{(?:@ops)}";
}

sub check{
  my( $num1, $op, $num2 ) = @_;
  if( @_ == 1 ){
    ($num1,$op,$num2) = 
      $_[0] =~ /([0-9]+) \s* ($compare_match) \s* ([0-9]+)/x;
  } elsif( @_ != 3 ){
    die 'wrong number of arguments'; # could be improved
  }
  unless( $op and exists $compare{$op} ){
    die "unknown op of '$op'"; # could be improved
  }

  # the heart of this implementation
  return $compare{$op}->($num1,$num2);
}
if( check('2<3') ){ # one arg
  print "Yes\n"; # <---
}else{
  print "No\n";
}
if( check('2>3') ){ # one arg
  print "Yes\n";
}else{
  print "No\n"; # <---
}

if( check(qw'2 < 3') ){ # three arg
  print "Yes\n"; # <---
}else{
  print "No\n";
}
if( check(qw'2 > 3') ){ # three arg
  print "Yes\n";
}else{
  print "No\n"; # <---
}

# dies
if( check(qw'2 **** 3') ){ ... }

You should note how easy it was to add in more comparison ops with this method.
( All I had to do was add them to @ops in BEGIN{} )

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