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I am trying to clean data using ddply but it is running very slowly on 1.3M rows.

Sample code:

#Create Sample Data Frame
num_rows <- 10000
df <- data.frame(id=sample(1:20, num_rows, replace=T), 
                Consumption=sample(-20:20, num_rows, replace=T), 
                StartDate=as.Date(sample(15000:15020, num_rows, replace=T), origin = "1970-01-01"))
df$EndDate <- df$StartDate + 90
#df <- df[order(df$id, df$StartDate, df$Consumption),]
#Are values negative? 
# Needed for subsetting in ddply rows with same positive and negative values
df$Neg <- ifelse(df$Consumption < 0, -1, 1)
df$Consumption <- abs(df$Consumption)

I have written a function to remove rows where there is a consumption value in one row that is identical but negative to a consumption value in another row (for the same id).

#Remove rows from a data frame where there is an equal but opposite consumption value
#Should ensure only one negative value is removed for each positive one. 
clean_negatives <- function(x3){
  copies <- abs(sum(x3$Neg))
  sgn <- ifelse(sum(x3$Neg) <0, -1, 1) 
  x3 <- x3[0:copies,]
  x3$Consumption <- sgn*x3$Consumption
  x3$Neg <- NULL
  x3}

I then use ddply to apply that function to remove these erroneous rows in the data

ptm <- proc.time()
df_cleaned <- ddply(df, .(id,StartDate, EndDate, Consumption),
                    function(x){clean_negatives(x)})
proc.time() - ptm

I was hoping I could use data.table to make this go faster but I couldn't work out how to employ data.table to help.

With 1.3M rows, so far it is taking my desktop all day to compute and still hasn't finished.

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1  
In the natural language description you have not explained operations on date values and why there is a "+90" in the code. Also you can replace df$Neg <- ifelse(df$Consumption < 0, -1, 1) with df$Neg <- sign(df$Consumption). You really should NOT overwrite df$Consumption. –  BondedDust Jan 22 '13 at 7:05
    
Ouch, a minus 1 for my first question. Sorry, I was trying to generate data that looked like mine but was easily reproducible and scalable. I thought this would be better than an anonymised dput dump. I do have a few more columns in my real data which is why the ddply function appear to call all columns in this example. Thanks for the sign function, much nicer. To avoid writing over $Consumption, are you suggesting that I create a new non-signed $Consumption column or is there a way to aggregate in ddply ignoring the sign of the value in a column ie abs(“Consumption)? –  Oscar Smith Jan 24 '13 at 4:02
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1 Answer

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Your question asks about data.table implementation. So, I've shown it here. Your function could be drastically simplified as well. You can first get the sign by summing up Neg and then filter the table and then multiply Consumption by sign (as shown below).

require(data.table)
# get the data.table in dt
dt <- data.table(df, key = c("id", "StartDate", "EndDate", "Consumption"))
# first obtain the sign directly
dt <- dt[, sign := sign(sum(Neg)), by = c("id", "StartDate", "EndDate", "Consumption")]
# then filter by abs(sum(Neg))
dt.fil <- dt[, .SD[seq_len(abs(sum(Neg)))], by = c("id", "StartDate", "EndDate", "Consumption")]
# modifying for final output (line commented after Statquant's comment
# dt.fil$Consumption <- dt.fil$Consumption * dt.fil$sign
dt.fil[, Consumption := (Consumption*sign)]
dt.fil <- subset(dt.fil, select=-c(Neg, sign))

Benchmarking

  • The data with million rows:

    #Create Sample Data Frame
    num_rows <- 1e6
    df <- data.frame(id=sample(1:20, num_rows, replace=T), 
                    Consumption=sample(-20:20, num_rows, replace=T), 
                    StartDate=as.Date(sample(15000:15020, num_rows, replace=T), origin = "1970-01-01"))
    df$EndDate <- df$StartDate + 90
    df$Neg <- ifelse(df$Consumption < 0, -1, 1)
    df$Consumption <- abs(df$Consumption)
    
  • The data.table function:

    FUN.DT <- function() {
        require(data.table)
        dt <- data.table(df, key=c("id", "StartDate", "EndDate", "Consumption"))
        dt <- dt[, sign := sign(sum(Neg)), 
                   by = c("id", "StartDate", "EndDate", "Consumption")]
        dt.fil <- dt[, .SD[seq_len(abs(sum(Neg)))], 
                   by=c("id", "StartDate", "EndDate", "Consumption")]
        dt.fil[, Consumption := (Consumption*sign)]
        dt.fil <- subset(dt.fil, select=-c(Neg, sign))
    }
    
  • Your function with ddply

    FUN.PLYR <- function() {
        require(plyr)
        clean_negatives <- function(x3) {
            copies <- abs(sum(x3$Neg))
            sgn <- ifelse(sum(x3$Neg) <0, -1, 1) 
            x3 <- x3[0:copies,]
            x3$Consumption <- sgn*x3$Consumption
            x3$Neg <- NULL
            x3
        }
        df_cleaned <- ddply(df, .(id, StartDate, EndDate, Consumption), 
                               function(x) clean_negatives(x))
    }
    
  • Benchmarking with rbenchmark (with 1 run only)

    require(rbenchmark)
    benchmark(FUN.DT(), FUN.PLYR(), replications = 1, order = "elapsed")
    
            test replications elapsed relative user.self sys.self user.child sys.child
    1   FUN.DT()            1   6.137    1.000     5.926    0.211          0         0
    2 FUN.PLYR()            1 242.268   39.477   152.855    82.881         0         0
    

My data.table implementation is about 39 times faster than your current plyr implementation (I compare mine to your implementation because the functions are different).

Note: I loaded the packages within the function in order to obtain the complete time to obtain the result. Also, for the same reason I converted the data.frame to data.table with keys inside the benchmarking function. This is therefore the minimum speed-up.

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2  
@-Arun: doing dt.fil$Consumption <- dt.fil$Consumption * dt.fil$sign you are doing a copy of the whole table. You should prefer dt.fil[,Consumption:=(Consumption*sign)] which update by reference. –  statquant Jan 23 '13 at 16:57
    
@statquant, you are absolutely right. Give me sometime, I'll update the post. Thanks a lot for pointing out! –  Arun Jan 23 '13 at 18:51
    
@Arun, that is amazing and runs almost 100 times faster (4 min compared with 7 hours). There is one slight difference in that values with zero $Consumption are also removed. I was oringally keeping them and cleaning out only those that were replicated in $StartDate and $EndDate as well. –  Oscar Smith Jan 24 '13 at 4:14
    
@Arun, Sorry in retrospect my questions wasnt very clear. I have been generally subsetting with ddply and running a function on each subset e.g. ddply(df, .(id,StartDate, EndDate, Consumption),function(x){clean_negatives(x)}) <br/> In general, is it possible to acheive the same thing using data.table? For example dt[, clean_negatives(x), by = c("ACTEW_ID", "StartDate", "EndDate", "Consumption")] –  Oscar Smith Jan 24 '13 at 4:23
1  
@Arun, just for info the last line dt.fil <- subset(dt.fil, select=-c(Neg, sign)) has a more data.table centric expression dt.fil[,c("Neg","sign"):=NULL] but data.table:::subset does not copy so it is equivalent... –  statquant Jan 24 '13 at 10:36
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