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this question is applicable on different RDBMS: MySQL and SQL Server

I've been searching for this all night and I can't find it on the net. My problem is all about uniqueness and foreign keys. Consider the following schema:

CREATE TABLE Male
(
    StudentID INT,
    FirstName VARCHAR(20) NOT NULL,
    MiddleName VARCHAR(20) NOT NULL,
    LastName VARCHAR(20) NOT NULL,
    -- other columns ...
    CONSTRAINT male_PK PRIMARY KEY (StudentID),
    CONSTRAINT male_UQ UNIQUE (FirstName, MiddleName, LastName)
);

CREATE TABLE Female
(
    StudentID INT,
    FirstName VARCHAR(20) NOT NULL,
    MiddleName VARCHAR(20) NOT NULL,
    LastName VARCHAR(20) NOT NULL,
    -- other columns ...
    CONSTRAINT Female_PK PRIMARY KEY (StudentID),
    CONSTRAINT Female_UQ UNIQUE (FirstName, MiddleName, LastName)
);

CREATE TABLE ClassList
(
    ClassID INT,
    Name VARCHAR(30),
    ClassYear INT,
    -- other columns ...
    CONSTRAINT ClassList_PK PRIMARY KEY (ClassID),
    CONSTRAINT ClassList_UQ UNIQUE (Name, ClassYear)
);

The reason why table Male and Female are separated is because they are maintained by different sql accounts.


The problem now is the Association Class.

CREATE Student_Class
(
    SudentID INT,
    ClassID INT,
    CONSTRAINT tb_UQ UNIQUE (StudentID, ClassID)
)

So my questions are:

  • How can I set the uniqueness of the StudentID from both tables Male and Female. I can't find that on the net.
  • How can I enforce Foreign Key constraints in which the value column of the association class table come from two tables: Male and Female?

Suggestions are also Accepted.

Thank You

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Do you really want to have two tables for both female and male? Or this is just example? –  Hamlet Hakobyan Jan 22 '13 at 6:54
2  
Why don't you just create a third table which shows StudentID, Gender. In it you can keep the uniqueness of the student id's and keep track of their gender at the same time. You can make StudentID foreign key in the Male and Female tables. –  HerpaMoTeH Jan 22 '13 at 6:59
    
@HamletHakobyan it's by design, i can't alter the tables. my jobs is to create association class. –  Walter Jan 22 '13 at 7:06
    
@MahmoudGamal I think it is not needed since the gender is from the other tables already. I can't alter the schema. My Job is to create an association class. –  Walter Jan 22 '13 at 7:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I don't think it's a great idea to let user privileges dictate your schema but if you have to then I think the idea mentioned by HerpaMoTeH is a good one. A third table with id, gender and with the id used as an FK in the gender specific tables and student_class.

Another solution is to just split your student_class table into two: male_student_class and female_student_class

Alternatively you could create 2 sets of stored procedures (male and female) for CRUD operations on a single student table. Then you would deny priviliges to the actual table for your users but grant them access to the appropriate set of stored procedures. Your schema would be simplified to:

CREATE TABLE Student
(
    StudentID INT,
    GenderId INT,
    FirstName VARCHAR(20) NOT NULL,
    MiddleName VARCHAR(20) NOT NULL,
    LastName VARCHAR(20) NOT NULL,
    -- other columns ...

);


CREATE Student_Class
(
   SudentID INT,
   ClassID INT,
  CONSTRAINT tb_UQ UNIQUE (StudentID, ClassID)
)
share|improve this answer

This is why attribute splitting is bad - it starts "infecting" the other tables in odd ways.

You can have:

CREATE Student_Class
(
    MaleStudentID INT NULL,
    FemaleStudentID INT NULL,
    ClassID INT NOT NULL,
    CONSTRAINT tb_UQ UNIQUE (MaleStudentID, FemaleStudentID, ClassID)
)

Since MySQL, so far as I'm aware, doesn't support CHECK constraints, you'll also have to create a trigger that ensures only one, and exactly one, of MaleStudentID and FemaleStudentID is NOT NULL.

You can now apply your foreign key constraints in an obvious manner.


For SQL Server, you would have a check constraint:

ALTER TABLE Student_Class ADD CONSTRAINT CK_Students_Nullability CHECK (
    (MaleStudentID is null and FemaleStudentID is not null) or
    (MaleStudentID is not null and FemaleStudentID is null)
)
share|improve this answer

You can:

Set a range for StudentID to identify Male / Female. For example 10000 to 19999 for male and 20000 to 29999 for female

Alternately, you can add a redundant column "Sex" in both tables, with M for male and F for female and make that part of the reference

Raj

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