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I'm stuck with a decryption problem I'm having. I have a really basic cipher that is only the alphabet and is offset by 1 letter, like this:

A    B
B    C
C    D
D    E
to z  to A

the right column is the letters I'm given, and I need to turn them to the letters on the left.

I'm reading this from a file, and saving each column into a list like this

#!/usr/bin/python

key = "key.txt"
encrypted = "encrypted.txt"
decrypted = "decrypted.txt"

encryptedList = []
decryptedList = []

with open(key, "r") as file:
    for line in file:
        currentLine = line.split()

        currentDecrypted = currentLine[0]
        currentEncrypted = currentLine[1]

        decryptedList.append(currentEncrypted)
        encryptedList.append(currentDecrypted)

file.close()

counter = 0
with open(encrypted, "r") as file:
for line in file:
    currentLine = line
    for letter in currentLine:
        currentLetter = letter
        for item in encryptedList:
            if(item == currentLetter):
            ####here's where the problem starts####
            ####I've tried just printing counter, and I get mostly go    
                printencryptedList[counter-1]
                counter = 0
                break
            counter += 1

what I'm trying to decrypt is a text file that looks like this

FMMP
NZ OBNF JT KSMBB
KPIO TVDLT BQQ
GWWWWWWBMT PG DJJJJJH

I get the correct count numbers for FMMP, (5, 12, 12, 15) with counter -1, but then i get 39, 25,40 and so on. Any help would be greatly appreciated, and let me know if you need more info.

I also welcome ideas on better/easier ways to do this, but I would also like a solution similar to this, so I can figure out what's going on here. Thanks

Alright, thanks for all the answers and info. I'm posting what I finally did and it works. I'm sure it's not as pythonic as it should be, but I implemented a few things that people mentioned. Thanks for the info.

import string

key = "key.txt"
encrypted = ""encrypted.txt"
decrypted = "decrypted.txt


encryptedString = ""
decryptedString = ""

keyDict = {}

with open(key, "r") as file:
    for line in file:
    currentLine = line.split()

    currentDecrypted = currentLine[0]
    currentEncrypted = currentLine[1]

    keyDict[currentDecrypted] = currentEncrypted


with open(encrypted, "r") as file:
    for line in file:
    currentLine = line
        for letter in currentLine:
        currentLetter = letter
        encryptedString += letter
            for key in keyDict:
            if(keyDict[key] == letter):
                decryptedString += key
                break
            elif(letter == " "):
                decryptedString += " "
                break
            elif(letter == "\n"):
                decryptedString += "\n"
                break




with open(decrypted, "a") as file:
    file.write(decryptedString)
share|improve this question
1  
Have a look at Python's dictionaries (instead of your two parallel lists). –  eumiro Jan 22 '13 at 7:58
    
Interesting idea, thanks. I've used dictionaries before, and at first I didn't use a dictionary because I thought not being able to order them would matter, but I guess it actually won't. –  trueCamelType Jan 22 '13 at 8:01
    
Yeah, sorry, I removed the post that you said "No" to right after I posted it because I realized my mistake. Thanks –  trueCamelType Jan 22 '13 at 8:02
    
maybe is homework, maybe is not, but if you want to use this in a real project, dont! Use PyCrypto! Anyways, you dont need "file.close" if you're using "with" statement. –  StefanNch Jan 22 '13 at 8:05
    
Thanks, habit to put the file.close. –  trueCamelType Jan 22 '13 at 8:07

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You definitely should use dictionaries. Together with Pythons map(), your task is really simple:

import string

secret = """FMMP
NZ OBNF JT KPTIVB
KPIO TVDLT BTT
GVOEBNFOUBMT PG DPNQVUJOH"""

characters = list(string.uppercase)
cipher = dict(zip(characters[1:]+[characters[0]], characters))

decrypted = "".join(map(lambda x: cipher.get(x,x), secret))

print decrypted

I won't post the result of the decryption here as I don't have a "Parental Advisory"-sticker atm. ;-) Just try it!

Of course there are helper functions in the string-module, but OP wants to learn python, not implement a "bullet-proof" cryptographic system.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for letting me know what was on there was bad haha, I didn't even check it by hand first before I posted it. That's my bad. I changed it. –  trueCamelType Jan 22 '13 at 8:14
    
You're welcome. Actually, it's not that bad... ;-) –  Thorsten Kranz Jan 22 '13 at 8:21
    
Being a beginner in python, this is a lot to learn in one step :) map is new to me, and so is lambda. Thanks for this, now I've got lots to read through. –  trueCamelType Jan 22 '13 at 8:46
    
That was my intent. Python has many nice programming patterns from many different paradigms. These two concepts are functional, and I love it. –  Thorsten Kranz Jan 22 '13 at 8:47
    
dic.get(x,x) is equivalent to x if cipher.get(x) is None else cipher[x]. –  Ashwini Chaudhary Jan 22 '13 at 8:47

str.translate is best suited for Caesar cipher type encryption which seems to be what you are trying to do

You first need to create a translation table through string.maketrans

The Upper Case alpha characters can be fetched from string.ascii_uppercase

To Rotate the Alpha Characters you can simply do ascii_uppercase[1:] + ascii_uppercase[0]

Now it's a cakewalk from here

>>> secret = """FMMP
NZ OBNF JT KPTIVB
KPIO TVDLT BTT
GVOEBNFOUBMT PG DPNQVUJOH"""
>>> from string import ascii_uppercase as UPPER, maketrans
>>> print secret.translate(maketrans(UPPER[1:] + UPPER[0], UPPER))
share|improve this answer

Python has built in functions for these kinds of simple ciphers, so there is no need to use dictionaries:

string.translate

string.maketrans

Example:

>>> s='''FMMP
NZ OBNF JT KSMBB
KPIO TVDLT BQQ
GWWWWWWBMT PG DJJJJJH'''
>>> import string
>>> tr = string.maketrans(string.uppercase[1:]+'A', string.uppercase)
>>> print string.translate(s,tr)
share|improve this answer

Use a dictionary and a converter function instead:

my_crypt = {
    "a":"b",
    "b":"c",
    "c":"d"
    ...
}

def crypt_str(in_str, crypt_dict):
    out_str = ""
    for char in in_str:
        if char in crypt_dict:
            out_str += crypt_dict[char]
        else:
            out_str += char
    return out_str

>>> print(crypt_str("hello!", my_crypt))
ifmmp!

The advantage over other methods provided here: If you ever want to change the way it converts, for example turn characters into numbers - it works all the same.

share|improve this answer

I have a really basic cipher that is only the alphabet and is offset by 1 letter.

Is this true? The code you show supports arbitrary substitution. If that's not needed, then:

encstr = 'FMMP NZ OBNF JT KPTIVB KPIO TVDLT BTT GVOEBNFOUBMT PG DPNQVUJOH'
decstr = ''.join([(chr(ord(ech)-1) if 'A' <= ech <= 'Z' else ech) for ech in encstr])

EDIT

The original example expects cleartext 'Z' to wrap to 'A' rather than bump to '[' (in ASCII). To properly handle this:

''.join([(chr(ord('A')+(ord(ech)-ord('A')-1)%26 ) if 'A' <= ech <= 'Z' else ech) for ech in encstr])

So this is getting a little ugly. translate is starting to look good at this point. See @Abhijit's answer.

share|improve this answer
    
Your code seems to be unchecked. It treats the "space" just like any char and therefore messes it up. You also have a typo: for ech in enc]. I'll fix this. –  Thorsten Kranz Jan 22 '13 at 8:29
    
Thanks for the correction. I tested a couple versions locally but pasted the wrong line which also fixes the space issue, which I'm now editing. Thanks again. –  jimhark Jan 22 '13 at 9:25
    
This looks much better. –  Thorsten Kranz Jan 22 '13 at 9:28
    
@ThorstenKranz Good. Thanks for your help. –  jimhark Jan 22 '13 at 9:29

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