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I have such array in ruby (document language [even index] and number of words [odd index])

words = ["en",200,"ru","120","es",140,"ru",240]

Final result should look like:

{"en"=>200,"ru=>360","es"=>140}
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closed as not a real question by sawa, Jack, brenjt, JLRishe, Lars Kotthoff Jan 22 '13 at 18:06

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
Why is '120' a String but the other numbers are Fixnums? –  Jörg W Mittag Jan 22 '13 at 12:13

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Ah, you need to sum duplicate keys. So, the Hash::[] method won't work here. No problem, use each_slice + each_with_object then:

words = ["en",200,"ru","120","es",140,"ru",240]

hash = words.each_slice(2).each_with_object({}) do |(k, v), memo|
  memo[k] ||= 0
  memo[k] += v.to_i
end

hash # => {"en"=>200, "ru"=>360, "es"=>140}
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You can use each_slice and inject to first slice the array into chunks and then add the values.

This is version which is roughly equivalent to the one by Sergio Tulentsev but is a bit shorter (and works in Ruby 1.8).

hash = words.each_slice(2).inject(Hash.new(0)) do |hash, (k, v)|
  hash[k] += v.to_i
  hash
end

Note that I initialize the hash with a default value of 0. Sergio could have done the same, so that his version would look like this:

hash = words.each_slice(2).each_with_object(Hash.new(0)) do |(k, v), memo|
  memo[k] += v.to_i
end

Note that each_with_object as used by Sergio was introduced in Ruby 1.9 and is thus not available in older Ruby versions, which might not by an issue though.

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words = ['en', 200, 'ru', 120, 'es', 140, 'ru', 240]

words.
 each_slice(2).
 each_with_object(Hash.new(0)) {|(lang, wordcount), acc| acc[lang] += wordcount }
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words = ["en",200,"ru","120","es",140,"ru",240]

h1 = Hash[*words.flatten]
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1  
This doesn't produce desired result –  Sergio Tulentsev Jan 22 '13 at 8:19

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