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I have gotten the following to work:

for i in {2..10}
do
    echo "output: $i"
done

It produces a bunch of lines of output: 2, output: 3, so on.

However, trying to run the following:

max=10
for i in {2..$max}
do
    echo "$i"
done

produces the following:

output: {2..10}

How can I get the compiler to realize it should treat $max as the other end of the array, and not part of a string?

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1  
what system and shell are you using? What kind of goofy system has sh or bash, but doesn't have seq, a coreutil? –  whatsisname Sep 18 '09 at 16:08
4  
FreeBSD doesn't. –  Nietzche-jou Sep 18 '09 at 16:12
    
echo "$i should be echo "$i" -- won't fix the problem, though. –  Dave Jarvis Sep 18 '09 at 16:19
    
Small style nit: I usually see the do and then keywords on the same line as for and if, respectively. E.g., for i in {2..10}; do –  a paid nerd Sep 18 '09 at 16:33
    
possible duplicate of Is it possible to use a variable in for syntax in bash? –  Barmar Aug 1 '13 at 15:00
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9 Answers

up vote 68 down vote accepted

brace expansion, {x..y} is performed before other expansions, so you cannot use that for variable length sequences.

Instead, use the seq 2 $max method as mobrule stated.

So, for your example it would be:

max=10
for i in `seq 2 $max`
do
    echo "$i"
done
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1  
+1 for explanation of why OP technique didn't work. –  system PAUSE Sep 18 '09 at 16:24
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For loop in a single command-line

for i in *; do echo $i; done

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Here it worked for on MAC-OS // It includes the example of BSD date, how to increment and decrement in date also

for ((i=28; i>=6 ; i--));
do
dat=`date -v-${i}d -j "+%Y%m%d"` 
echo $dat
done
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Step the loop manually:

i=0
max=10
while [ $i -lt $max ]
do
    echo "output: $i"
    true $(( i++ ))
done

If you don’t have to be totally POSIX, you can use the arithmetic for loop:

max=10
for (( i=0; i < max; i++ )); do echo "output: $i"; done

Or use jot(1) on BSD systems:

for i in $( jot 0 10 ); do echo "output: $i"; done
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+1 for jot, which should be available on MacOS: developer.apple.com/mac/library/documentation/Darwin/Reference/… –  system PAUSE Sep 18 '09 at 18:12
1  
true $(( i++ )) doesn't work in all cases, so most portable would be true $((i=i+1)). –  Flow Mar 22 '12 at 14:50
    
semi colon should not come in "for (( i=0; i < max; i++ ));" –  logan Feb 10 at 13:02
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how about

max=10
for i in `eval echo {2..$max}`
do
    echo $i
done

You need the explicit 'eval' call to reevaluate the {} after variable substitution

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There's more than one way to do it.

max=10
for i in `eval "echo {2..$max}"`
do
    echo "$i"
done
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3  
A security risk, since eval will evaluate anything you set max to. Consider max="2}; echo ha; #", then replace echo ha with something more destructive. –  chepner Sep 12 '13 at 19:45
1  
(S)he set max to 10. No risk. –  Conrad Meyer Apr 21 at 1:13
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Try the arithmetic-expression version of for:

max=10
for ((i=2; i<=$max; ++i )) ; 
do
    echo "$i"
done

This is available in most versions of bash, and should be Bourne shell (sh) compatible also.

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2  
Good answer, but this doesn't work with #!/bin/sh. –  Flow Mar 22 '12 at 14:44
    
@Flow: Hm, I just tried it on a couple of systems (Linux and BSD based) with #!/bin/sh and it worked fine. Invoked under bash and specifically under /bin/sh, still worked. Maybe the version of sh matters? Are you on some old Unix? –  system PAUSE Mar 26 '12 at 21:29
    
AFAIK QNX 6.3.0 –  Flow Mar 27 '12 at 7:20
3  
Very few systems have a dedicated sh, instead making it a link to other another shell. Ideally, such a shell invoked as sh would only support those features in the POSIX standard, but by default let some of their extra features through. The C-style for-loop is not a POSIX feature, but may be in sh mode by the actual shell. –  chepner Sep 12 '13 at 19:41
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Well, as I didn't have the seq command installed on my system (Mac OS 10.6.1), I ended up using a while loop instead:

max=5
i=1

while [ $max -gt $i ]
do
    (stuff)
done

**shrugs** Whatever works.

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1  
seq is relatively new. I only found out about it a few months ago. But you can use a 'for' loop!! The disadvantage of a 'while' is that you have to remember to increment the counter somewhere inside the loop, or else loop downwards. –  system PAUSE Sep 18 '09 at 16:23
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Is the seq command available on your system?

for i in `seq 2 $max`
do
  echo "output: $i"
done

EDIT: No seq? Then how about a poor man's seq with perl?

seq=`perl -e "\$,=' ';print 2..$max"`
for i in seq
do
  echo "output: $i"
done

Watch those quote marks.

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I just checked that; it doesn't seem that it is. –  eykanal Sep 18 '09 at 16:02
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protected by Brad Larson Nov 1 '13 at 17:19

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