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How can I deploy and host multiple python projects with different dependancies on the same server at the same time?

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You've answered your own question. Use virtualenv. – katrielalex Jan 22 '13 at 9:05
    
(A virtual environment is basically a copy of Python in a folder that has its own collection of installed packages etc. To set one up you choose a folder somewhere, and run virtualenv on it; that will create a Python and a pip executable. Installing packages with that pip will then cause them only to be installed for that particular Python.) – katrielalex Jan 22 '13 at 9:07
    
just create another virtualenv in other path. – vahid chakoshy Jan 22 '13 at 9:12
    
virtualenv example with screencast and we all love a screencast. – sotapme Jan 22 '13 at 9:14
    
I know how to use virtual environments for development, but just one virtual environment can be activated at the same time (by doing source sitename/bin/activate). How can I run multiple of those at the same time? – Euphorbium Jan 22 '13 at 9:16
up vote 1 down vote accepted

It's not true of course that only one virtualenv can be activated at once. Yes, only one can be active in a shell session at once, but your sites are not deployed via shell sessions. Each WSGI process, for example, will create its own environment: so all you need to do is to ensure that each wsgi script activates the correct virtualenv, as is (in the case of mod_wsgi at least) well documented.

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Use virtualenv for python. You can can install any other version of python/packages in it, if required.

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