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I'm trying to do gaussian blur with OpenGL ES on my Android device. I use the method which is mentioned in

http://rastergrid.com/blog/2010/09/efficient-gaussian-blur-with-linear-sampling/

There is two framebuffers(A and B) in my app. Blur one dimensional by drawing A to B, and blur the other by drawing B to A. It's all right when only one image being blurred, it may catch up 50fps. But if the is more image being blurred, even very small, the FPS drops to 4~5. It's terrible to use this approach.

My questions are:

  1. Is the performance issue caused by switching the two FBOs multiple times in one frame?

  2. Is there any better way to do ping-pong rendering on Android devices.

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2  
Do you mean dimensional as in horizontal and vertical? –  Kaliber64 Jan 22 '13 at 9:50
    
@Kaliber64 Yes, I mean that. I haven't try to blur both horizontal and vertical at the same time. –  zhang Jan 22 '13 at 10:52
1  
When you say "if the is more image being blurred", are you saying that you are blurring multiple small images within one scene? Why not combine them and blur the single resulting image? –  Brad Larson Jan 22 '13 at 21:58
    
Also, are you using the OpenGL ES version of that which I describe in the comments there: rastergrid.com/blog/2010/09/… ? My version is optimized for the tile-based deferred renderers you'll find in many Android devices. –  Brad Larson Jan 22 '13 at 22:00
    
@BradLarson Thank you very much, I'll try your approach. (sorry for my spelling mistake, I mean there are more small images.) –  zhang Jan 23 '13 at 2:38

1 Answer 1

You should use just one buffer and blur them in both directions at once.

Here is a standard OpenGL shader that I use and found it very simple.

    uniform sampler2D texture_map;
    uniform float blur;

    uniform float blur_Size;

    float blurSize = 1.0/blur_Size; // I've chosen this size because this will result in that every step will be one pixel wide if the texture is of size 512x512

    void main() {

    if (blur!=0.0){

           vec4 sum = vec4(0.0);

           // blur in y (vertical)
           // take nine samples, with the distance blurSize between them
           sum += texture2D(texture_map, vec2(texcoord.x - 4.0*blurSize, texcoord.y)) * 0.05;
           sum += texture2D(texture_map, vec2(texcoord.x - 3.0*blurSize, texcoord.y)) * 0.09;
           sum += texture2D(texture_map, vec2(texcoord.x - 2.0*blurSize, texcoord.y)) * 0.12;
           sum += texture2D(texture_map, vec2(texcoord.x - blurSize, texcoord.y)) * 0.15;
           sum += texture2D(texture_map, vec2(texcoord.x, texcoord.y)) * 0.16;
           sum += texture2D(texture_map, vec2(texcoord.x + blurSize, texcoord.y)) * 0.15;
           sum += texture2D(texture_map, vec2(texcoord.x + 2.0*blurSize, texcoord.y)) * 0.12;
           sum += texture2D(texture_map, vec2(texcoord.x + 3.0*blurSize, texcoord.y)) * 0.09;
           sum += texture2D(texture_map, vec2(texcoord.x + 4.0*blurSize, texcoord.y)) * 0.05;

           sum += texture2D(texture_map, vec2(texcoord.x, texcoord.y - 4.0*blurSize)) * 0.05;
           sum += texture2D(texture_map, vec2(texcoord.x, texcoord.y - 3.0*blurSize)) * 0.09;
           sum += texture2D(texture_map, vec2(texcoord.x, texcoord.y - 2.0*blurSize)) * 0.12;
           sum += texture2D(texture_map, vec2(texcoord.x, texcoord.y - blurSize)) * 0.15;
           sum += texture2D(texture_map, vec2(texcoord.x, texcoord.y)) * 0.16;
           sum += texture2D(texture_map, vec2(texcoord.x, texcoord.y + blurSize)) * 0.15;
           sum += texture2D(texture_map, vec2(texcoord.x, texcoord.y + 2.0*blurSize)) * 0.12;
           sum += texture2D(texture_map, vec2(texcoord.x, texcoord.y + 3.0*blurSize)) * 0.09;
           sum += texture2D(texture_map, vec2(texcoord.x, texcoord.y + 4.0*blurSize)) * 0.05;

           gl_FragColor = sum/2.0;
        }

Feed The uniform blur_Size the width or height ( which ever is bigger). If thats too much blur or to little just adjust the number you feed in. But width and height are a good place to start. The bigger the number the more blur. Also try averaging the two. If the image is really rectangular your blur may be way too large.

60 on a 60x60 image is a 1:1 blur but if your image is say 512x512 a blur of 60 is going to be hardly noticeable. The blur is a ratio of blur amount to image size.

Its a hack and slash method buts its quick and simple with no algorithms.

best of luck

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1  
May be this blurs your scene, but it's not a Gaussian blur, not even close. Your are sampling 18 pixels for each pixel, instead of the traditional 81. There's a very clear reason why it's done in two passes. –  Alejandro Cotroneo Feb 1 '13 at 17:49
    
It blurs >.> .wah. I can't tell the difference. –  Kaliber64 Feb 8 '13 at 19:07
    
I was told this method as down-sampling. It's really fast. But it's a litter difficult to accept the result for me. Now I'm trying not to use blur and storing more cache. Thank you anyway. –  zhang Feb 20 '13 at 3:14

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