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FURTHER EDIT the following is not production code - I'm just playing around with a couple of classes trying to figure out how I run processes within threads - or even if that is viable. I've read various definitions on MSDN but am a newbie to threads and processes so any further definitive references to articles would be appreciated


this is fine...

class Program {
    static void Main(string[] args) {

        Notepad np = new Notepad();
        Thread th = new Thread(new ThreadStart(np.startNPprocess));
        th.Start();

        Console.WriteLine("press [enter] to exit");
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

public class Notepad {

    public void startNPprocess() {

        Process pr = new Process();
        ProcessStartInfo prs = new ProcessStartInfo();
        prs.FileName = @"notepad.exe";
        pr.StartInfo = prs;
        pr.Start();     

    }
}

this isn't...

class Program {
    static void Main(string[] args) {


        Process pr = new Process();
        ProcessStartInfo prs = new ProcessStartInfo();
        prs.FileName = @"notepad.exe";
        pr.StartInfo = prs;

        ThreadStart ths = new ThreadStart(pr.Start);
        Thread th = new Thread(ths);
        th.Start();


        Console.WriteLine("press [enter] to exit");
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

Why does the second not do the same as the first? In the second script I'm trying to pass Process.Start using the Threadstart delegate ...I thought this would be ok as its a void method? Is the first script the only option or can I change the second slightly so that it effectively does the same job as the first i.e start an instance of Notepad in a specified thread?


EDIT

Some background as to why I'm playing around with this code: ultimately I need to build an application which will be running several Excel processes simultaneously. These processes can be troublesome when VBA errors as it results in a dialogbox. So I thought if each process was running in a thread then if a particular thread has been running for too long then I could kill the thread. I'm a newbie to Threads/Processes so basically playing around with possibilities at the moment.

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4  
What is the benefits of starting a process from another thread? Why don't you simply starts the process from the current Thread? The result will be the same, as starting a process won't wait for its completion. –  Steve B Jan 22 '13 at 9:46
    
The benefit may be no requirement to read the documentation about the Process class ;) –  TomTom Jan 22 '13 at 9:48
1  
Process.Start is not a void method, it returns bool. –  Chris McAtackney Jan 22 '13 at 9:49
    
Concerning your edit, shouldn't you automate Excel using COM (or better, not using excel at all using open xml SDK), instead of starting a new process? –  Steve B Jan 22 '13 at 10:24
    
Or just not automate Excel ... support.microsoft.com/kb/257757 (yes it's for server-side stuff, but it seems applicable here) –  ta.speot.is Jan 22 '13 at 10:25

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

A ThreadStart expects a delegate that returns void. Process.Start returns bool, so is not a compatible signature. You can swallow the return value in by using a lambda that gives you a delegate of the correct return type (i.e. void) as follows:

    Process pr = new Process();
    ProcessStartInfo prs = new ProcessStartInfo();
    prs.FileName = @"notepad.exe";
    pr.StartInfo = prs;

    ThreadStart ths = new ThreadStart(() => pr.Start());
    Thread th = new Thread(ths);
    th.Start();

...but it's probably advisable to check the return value:

    ThreadStart ths = new ThreadStart(() => {
        bool ret = pr.Start();
        //is ret what you expect it to be....
    });

Of course, a process starts in a new process (a completely separate bunch of threads), so starting it on a thread is completely pointless.

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Downvoter, please explain what you believe to be problematic with this answer so I can improve it. –  spender Jan 22 '13 at 9:54
    
+1 @Spender thanks for spending the time on this - my OP is currently -3...seems to be a few keen anonymous downvoters out there! –  whytheq Jan 22 '13 at 10:18
1  
cool this was the line I needed! ...Of course, a process starts in a new process (a completely separate bunch of threads), so starting it on a thread is completely pointless. –  whytheq Jan 29 '13 at 12:50

Just start the process normally using this code:

Process.Start("notepad.exe");

There is no point and no benefits in creating a thread to run a new process. It's like running a batch file that executes "cmd.exe" when you can directly execute "cmd.exe"... you are just doing more than what's necessary for nothing. Don't reinvent the wheel and play easy :P

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+1 thanks for the help; seemed like quite a few didn't appreciate my question - currently -3 ! –  whytheq Jan 22 '13 at 10:22
    
the benefit of this code is that I'm playing around with these classes trying to understand what they do - this is not production code - I'm just trying to figure out how I run processes within threads - or if I can? –  whytheq Jan 22 '13 at 10:41
    
Of course you can. But if you ask me if it's good I will answer no. It makes no sense. Threads are good for running application code, not external processes. –  Zarathos Jan 22 '13 at 10:46

you can make changes like

ThreadStart ths = new ThreadStart(delegate() { pr.Start(); });
share|improve this answer
    
+1 thanks for the input –  whytheq Jan 22 '13 at 10:22

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