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Does anyone know how to code the Harmonic Series in python?

H(n) = 1 + 1/2 + 1/3 + ... + 1/n

Note: We're not allowed to import from predefined modules. The output must be the numerator and the denominator of the answer in fraction form (lowest terms).

so here's my code for this harmonic series.

n = input("Enter n:")  

def harmonic(n):  
    a=1  
    b=1  
    for d in range(2, n+1):  
            a = a*d+b  
            b = b*d  
            return (a,b)  
            x == max(a,b)%min(a, b)  
            if x == 0:  
                y=min(a,b)  
                return y  
            else:  
                y=min(a,b)/x  
                return y  
            a=a/y  
            b=b/y  
            return (a,b)  
print harmonic(n)  

what's wrong? Whatever I input, the output is always (3,2).. what's wrong ?? :( Help please.. thanks :)

share|improve this question
1  
You always return (a,b) at the first iteration. – Scharron Jan 22 '13 at 10:02
    
As @Scharron said, you always return a, b. Notice that you have an if...else bloc that gets executed no matter what. Both branches return a value. So your for loop never goes around more than once. – Joel Cornett Jan 22 '13 at 10:04
    
Hint: You probably want to break it down into 2 steps. 1) add a bunch of fractions up (to do this, you will want to be able to find the lcm of 2 fractions) and 2) reduce the fractions. Why not break them down into separate functions? – Joel Cornett Jan 22 '13 at 10:14
    
So.. what should i do to make it better? what should i use in place of return? Thanks :) – user1950302 Jan 22 '13 at 10:18
    
@JoelCornett . we're not allowed to import fractions :((( – user1950302 Jan 22 '13 at 10:19
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I have to check your attempt twice - and inserted a simple gcd (in the middle of the your original code)

n = input("Enter n:")

def harmonic(n): #original harmonic series
     a=1
     b=1
     for d in range(2, n+1):
         a = a*d+b
         b = b*d
     return(a,b)


def harmonic_lt(n): #_lt: harmonic series with lowest terms
                    #not pythonic, but simple
    a=1
    b=1
    for d in range(2, n+1):
        a = a*d+b
        b = b*d

    y=a
    x=b
    while x > 0:
        re = y % x
        y = x
        x = re

    a=a/y
    b=b/y
    return(a,b)

print harmonic(n)
print harmonic_lt(n)
share|improve this answer

As others pointed out, you are returning when d = 2 i.e. (1 + 1/2), it should be outside of the for loop.

Here's a code I wrote for doing the same:

#!Python2.7
def gcd(a, b):
    if b: return gcd(b, a%b)
    return a

def lcm(a, b):
    return a*b/gcd(a, b)

def start():
    n = int(raw_input())
    ans = reduce(lambda x, y: (x[0]*lcm(x[1],y[1])/x[1]+y[0]*lcm(x[1],y[1])/y[1], lcm(x[1],y[1])),[(1,x) for x in xrange(1,n+1)])
    _gcd = gcd(ans[0], ans[1])
    print (ans[0]/_gcd, ans[1]/_gcd)

start()

If you want to avoid using reduce, lamda and list comprehensions:

#!Python2.7
def gcd(a, b):
    if b: return gcd(b, a%b)
    return a

def lcm(a, b):
    assert a != 0
    assert b != 0
    return a*b/gcd(a, b)

def next(x, y):
    lcmxy = lcm(x[1], y[1])
    return (x[0]*lcmxy/x[1]+y[0]*lcmxy/y[1], lcmxy)

def start():
    n = int(raw_input())
    curr = (1,1)
    for x in xrange(2,n+1):
        curr = next(curr, (1,x))
    _gcd = gcd(curr[0], curr[1]) 
    print (curr[0]/_gcd, curr[1]/_gcd)

start()
share|improve this answer
3  
This won't necessarily give the reduced values: e.g. (147, 60). – DSM Jan 22 '13 at 10:39
    
@DSM - Thanks for pointing out. – sidi Jan 22 '13 at 10:43
    
Thank you so muchhh :)) By the way, what's the purpose of "assert"? thanks :) – user1950302 Jan 22 '13 at 11:08
    
They are a convenient way to debug. In my code, if a or b were 0, it would throw an AssertionError. – sidi Jan 22 '13 at 11:13
    
Okay okay.. I'm learning a lot here. thanks :) – user1950302 Jan 22 '13 at 13:44

You can find the denominator by finding the lowest common multiple of the numbers 1..n.

The nominator will then be the sum of all values denominator/x with x being all values from 1..n.

Here's some code:

def gcd(a, b):
    """Return greatest common divisor using Euclid's Algorithm."""
    while b:      
        a, b = b, a % b
    return a

def lcm(a, b):
    """Return lowest common multiple."""
    return a * b // gcd(a, b)

def lcmm(args):
    """Return lcm of args."""   
    return reduce(lcm, args)


def harmonic(n):
    lowest_common_multiple = lcmm(range(1,n))
    nominator = sum([lowest_common_multiple/i for i in range(1,n)])
    greatest_common_denominator = gcd(lowest_common_multiple, nominator)
    return nominator/greatest_common_denominator, lowest_common_multiple/greatest_common_denominator

print harmonic(7)
print harmonic(10)
print harmonic(20)
share|improve this answer
    
The OP says that "The output must be the numerator and the denominator of the answer in fraction form (lowest terms)" - I don't think he wants a generator – Volatility Jan 22 '13 at 10:07
    
Was still in the flow... sorry for the confusion – Thorsten Kranz Jan 22 '13 at 10:08
    
Mmmm... This isn't the harmonic series. – Joel Cornett Jan 22 '13 at 10:11
1  
I don't this is is quite right -- you could still wind up with cases where the numerator and denominator have a common factor. For example, harmonic(7) == (147, 60), but should really be (49, 20). Probably it would suffice to divide each of your returned n,d by gcd(n,d). – DSM Jan 22 '13 at 10:27
    
you're right, thanks for the hint. – Thorsten Kranz Jan 22 '13 at 10:27

Harmonic series:

1/1 + 1/2 + ... + 1/n == (n!/1 + n!/2 + ... + n!/n)/n!

therefore you can do:

nom = reduce(lambda s, x: s*x, xrange(1, n+1),1)   # n!
denom = sum([nom / x for x in xrange(1, n+1)])

Then you need to do gcd-reduction on nom and denom.
Use the version from Thorsten Kranz.

Note that this way only one call to gcd is needed!

Example:

def gcd(a, b):
    while b:      
        a, b = b, a % b
    return a


def harmonic(n):
    nom = reduce(lambda s, x: s*x, xrange(1,n+1), 1)   # n!
    denom = sum([nom / x for x in xrange(1, n+1)])
    f = gcd(denom, nom)
    return (denom / f), (nom / f)


print harmonic(10)
print harmonic(20)

(7381, 2520)
(55835135, 15519504)
share|improve this answer
    
thank you :) by the way, what do we mean when we use the term reduce? what does it give as an output? thanks. – user1950302 Jan 22 '13 at 13:42
    
@user1950302, first of all, thanks for finally accepting this answer -- compared to the answer of @sidi and @ThorstenKranz (both are correct and elegant!) has this answer the advantage of calling gcd just once -- I believe its therefore faster. – Theodros Zelleke Jan 22 '13 at 13:47
    
reduce is a concept from functional programming. Here it is called reduce(function(x, y), iterable, initial_value). It starts by evaluating result = function(initial_value, iterable[0]). Then it repeats result = function(result, iterable[i]) until all elements from iterable are used. The final value for result is then returned. So if n=3 then nom would be evaluated to nom = (1*1*2*3) where the first 1 is the initializer. This is of course 3!. – Theodros Zelleke Jan 22 '13 at 13:56

You always return (a,b) at the first iteration. – Scharron"

Return always ends a function. If you return (a,b), the rest of the code is unreachable

share|improve this answer
    
So,, what should i do?? I'm so confused :'( – user1950302 Jan 22 '13 at 10:10

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