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If I have a number greater than 20 but that can be divided evenly by 2 without any remainder, I want to determine what number gets me closest to 20. For example:

For 2048, dividing by 2 enough times would get me to 16 which is the closest I can get to 20. If the number is 800, the closest is 25.

I can write a loop and just keep dividing and comparing the range and pick the value that is closest. Is there maybe a simpler way, possibly through shifting bits?

EDIT: When I say it evenly divides by 2, I mean it divides all the way down to 2 as well. A number of 70 would only divide down to 35 evenly. A number like 2048 or 1024 will divide evenly all the way to 2.

Sample numbers: 2048, 1920, 1600, 1536, 1080..640, 352, 320, 176. These are typical image sizes from cameras.

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You need to check if your value is even on each step, so in any case you need a loop. –  mishadoff Jan 22 '13 at 10:21
    
What would you do with those number that cannot be divided by 2 without remainder (e.g. odd numbers, like 35?) –  GaborSch Jan 22 '13 at 10:24
    
He wants to do it for even numbers only. –  Swapnil Jan 22 '13 at 10:25
1  
For no reason other than to satisfy my curiosity... what is the use case for this? –  Duncan Jan 22 '13 at 10:26
1  
OMG The answer is 42! Divide it by 2 and you get 21 which is the closest integer to 20 without being 20. –  Peter Lawrey Jan 22 '13 at 10:34

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If your input number is x, I think you want x/2^[(log x/14)/log 2], assuming you want your target number to be in the interval [14,27].

In java code, Math's log function will come in handy (although base-2 logarithm would be even better), and you also need an integer cast (or somehow find the largest integer smaller than the expression in []).

What this does: Let x be your input and y be the number you want to find. Then, x=y*2^n for yet unknown n, while y is around 20 (see above). Obviously, n is the base-2 logarithm of x/y. Now, if you pick the smallest possible y, call it y', the integer part of the base-2 logarithm of x/y' is still the n we are looking for, unless x/y' differs from x/y by a factor of more than 2, which by assumption of repeated division by 2 it cannot. Thus, we have n and hence y=x/2^n.

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1  
explain your formula please –  mishadoff Jan 22 '13 at 10:25
2  
Yes, please do. I wonder if the up-voters understood the formula, or just thought "Hmmm, that looks clever!". –  Duncan Jan 22 '13 at 10:28
1  
closest to 20 not the same as around 20. For example, for input 70 algorithm must produce 35 –  mishadoff Jan 22 '13 at 10:33
    
Erm..."that looks clever"?! Maybe rather "that looks like an application of high-school math"? ;-) Anyway, typing the explanation took much longer than the interval between posting the answer and your comments. –  arne.b Jan 22 '13 at 10:34
    
I don't see how that works. I punched in some numbers and didn't get any integer values. Not even close. –  AndroidDev Jan 22 '13 at 10:35

You effectively want to trim all the trailing zero bits until you have a number which is greater than 13.

Another way to do this is to trim all the zeros, and add them back if the result is too small.

public static long func(long num) {
    if (num <= 26) return num;
    long trimZeros = num >>> Long.numberOfTrailingZeros(num);
    while(trimZeros <= 13) trimZeros <<= 1;
    return trimZeros;
}

26 is closer to 20 than 13, but 14 is closer to 20 than 28.

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1  
func(2048) would return 32 and not 16 as expected. –  stacker Jan 22 '13 at 10:43
    
@stacker I miss read, greater than 20. –  Peter Lawrey Jan 22 '13 at 10:51

If you want to use shifting you could start with something like this:

public static int func2(int val) {
    int min = Integer.MAX_VALUE;
    int close = 0;
    while (val > 1) {
        val = val >>> 1;
        if (Math.abs(val - 20) < min) {
            min = Math.abs(val - 20);
            close = val;
        }
    }
    return close;
}


public static void main() {
    for ( int i : new int []{2048, 1920, 1600, 1536, 1080, 640, 352, 320, 176}) {
       System.out.println( i + " -> " + func2( i ));
    }
}

Prints

2048 -> 16
1920 -> 15
1600 -> 25
1536 -> 24
1080 -> 16
640 -> 20
352 -> 22
320 -> 20
176 -> 22
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Is there any advantage over dividing by 2? I think, a clever compiler might replace dividings by 2 with a shift anyway. –  Christian Strempfer Jan 22 '13 at 10:33
    
@Chris He asked for the posibility to do that with shifting, I don't see an advantage. –  stacker Jan 22 '13 at 10:35
    
Yes, your answer is ok. I just wondered if it makes any difference. –  Christian Strempfer Jan 22 '13 at 10:53
    
Actually I was just trying to avoid loops. arne's solution does this. –  AndroidDev Jan 22 '13 at 10:58

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