Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

I have heard and read about flip-flops with regular expressions in Perl and Ruby recently, but I was unable to find how they really work and what the common use cases are.

Can anyone explain this in a language-agnostic manner?

Now that I understand what it is, and how it works, I would rephrase the question to be simply: What is a flip-flop operator?

share|improve this question
1  
Do you rather mean regexps in flip-flop? – choroba Jan 22 '13 at 12:14
    
Yeah, that's what I should really ask :) – samuil Jan 22 '13 at 13:00
up vote 11 down vote accepted

The flip-flop operator in Perl evaluates to true when the left operand is true, and keeps evaluating to true until the right operand is true. The left and right operand could be any kind of expression, but most often it is used with regexes.

With regexes, it is useful for finding all the lines between two markers. Here is a simple example that shows how it works:

use Modern::Perl;

while (<DATA>)
{
    if (/start/ .. /end/)
    {
        say "flip flop true: $_";
    }
    else
    {
        say "flip flop false: $_";
    }
}

__DATA__
foo
bar
start
inside
blah
this is the end
baz

The flip flop operator will be true for all lines from start until this is the end.

The two dot version of the operator allows first and second regex to both match on the same line. So, if your data looked like this, the above program would only be true for the line start blah end:

foo
bar
start blah end
inside
blah
this is the end
baz

If you don't want the first and second regexes to match the same line, you can use the three dot version: if (/start/ ... /end/).

Note that care should be taken not to confuse the flip-flop operator with the range operator. In list context, .. has an entirely different function: it returns a list of sequential values. e.g.

my @integers = 1 .. 1000; #makes an array of integers from 1 to 1000. 

I'm not familiar with Ruby, but Lee Jarvis's link suggests that it works similarly.

share|improve this answer
1  
Ruby: gist.github.com/baa007793b683ce3c5ca – Lee Jarvis Jan 22 '13 at 12:34

Here is a direct Ruby translation of @dan1111's demo (illustrating that Ruby stole more than the flip_flop from Perl):

while DATA.gets
  if $_ =~ /start/ .. $_ =~ /end/ 
    puts "flip flop true: #{$_}"
  else
    puts "flip flop false: #{$_}"
  end
end

__END__
foo
bar
start
inside
blah
this is the end
baz

More idiomatic ruby:

DATA.each do |line|
  if line =~ /start/ .. line =~ /end/ 
    puts "flip flop true: #{line}"
  else
    puts "flip flop false: #{line}"
  end
end

__END__
foo
bar
start
inside
blah
this is the end
baz
share|improve this answer
    
cool, just read about the flip-flop operator the other day while checking out perl, good to know that ruby (My go to scripting language) has it as well – Mike H-R May 14 '14 at 8:27
    
Why did each line get printed, rather than the flip-flop string? – onebree Dec 7 '15 at 17:50

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.