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public static void solveTowers(int disks, int sourcePeg, int destinationPeg, int tempPeg)
{
    //always set the base case in any type of recursion programs
    if(disks == 1)
    {
        System.out.printf("\n%d --> %d", sourcePeg, destinationPeg);
        return;
    }

    //call the method itself
    solveTowers(disks - 1, sourcePeg, tempPeg, destinationPeg);

    System.out.printf("\n%d --> %d", sourcePeg, destinationPeg);

    solveTowers(disks - 1, tempPeg, destinationPeg, sourcePeg);
}

My question is what is the "return" for under the first System.out statement ?

When debugging, after the first solveTowers method reaches the base case, which the disk == 1, it goes into the if statement, then after reach the return;, it goes to the second System.out statement, then following by the second solveTowers method, so question is why the return; skipped the first solveTowers but not the second one ?

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up vote 4 down vote accepted

The return statement ends the execution of the function or method once it is reached.

Since the return type of this method is void, it does not need to return a value in order to end the function, and can be called simply like this : return;

If the return type would have been different (for instance an integer), it would have to return an integer like this : return 1;

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in debugging, after return, it goes to the second System.out statement, then the next solveTower, could you explain that please ? – Twocode Jan 22 '13 at 10:57
    
That seems odd judging from the code i see here, but there probably is a function somewhere "above" SolveTowers that calls SolveTowers for different disks and/or pegs, causing the function to end up in a diffrent state than your at previous breakpoint. – Timothy Groote Jan 22 '13 at 10:59
    
Here's a handy dandy tip : if you have a stacktrace explorer, you can see how you ended up in your current function. this allows you to easily see which function is calling the function you are currently in ;) – Timothy Groote Jan 22 '13 at 11:02
    
The code left is just a main() which like this:public static void main(String[] args) { // TODO Auto-generated method stub int startPed = 1; int endPeg = 3; int tempPeg = 2; int totalDisks =3; TowersOfHanoi.solveTowers(totalDisks, startPed , endPeg, tempPeg); } – Twocode Jan 22 '13 at 11:02
    
(hint) The towers of hanoi is a problem that can be solved through recursion. So there is probably a loop somewhere that calls SolveTowers – Timothy Groote Jan 22 '13 at 11:03

This return; is saying that if you have just one disk, there is no need to do anything, so you just end the method's execution returning it. This is needed because the method is dealing with recursions and you must worry about the base case.

And since the method's return type is void, you don't need to return any value. So, just return;

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return is a Java statement that returns from the current method without executing any code that is following it.

In your case, the code checks if there is only one disk available, if so it just prints the solution and prevents the execution of the rest of the method.

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in debugging, after return, it goes to the second System.out statement, then the next solveTower, could you explain that please ? – Twocode Jan 22 '13 at 10:58
    
The solveTowers method is calling itself recursively – Veger Jan 22 '13 at 11:07

when you have only 1 disk then it need to stop execution and thats why it outputs the source and destination and exits out.

share|improve this answer
    
in debugging, after return, it goes to the second System.out statement, then the next solveTower, could you explain that please ? – Twocode Jan 22 '13 at 11:00

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