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I have written a straightforward C code that uses an engine to run two different algorithms depending on user input. It uses function pointers to the algorithm methods and objects. There is a nasty memory bug somewhere that I can not track down, so maybe I am allocating memory in the wrong way. What is going wrong?

Below is (the relevant parts of) a minimal working example of the code.

main.c

#include "engine.h"

int main()
{
  char *id = "one";

  Engine_t eng;

  Engine_init(&eng);
  Engine_select_algorithm(eng, id);
  Engine_run(eng);
}

engine.h

typedef struct _Engine *Engine_t;

engine.c

#include "engine.h"
#include "algorithm_one.h"
#include "algorithm_two.h"

typedef struct _Engine
{ 
  void *p_algorithm;

  void (*init)(Engine_t);
  void (*run)(Engine_t);

} Engine;

void Engine_init(Engine_t *eng)
{
  *eng = malloc(sizeof(Engine));

  (*eng)->p_algorithm = NULL;
}

void Engine_select_algorithm(Engine_t eng, char *id)
{
  if ( strcmp(id, "one") == 0 )
    {
      eng->init = Algorithm_one_init;
      eng->run  = Algorithm_one_run;
    }
  else if ( strcmp(id, "two") == 0 )
    {
      eng->init = Algorithm_two_init;
      eng->run  = Algorithm_two_run;
    }
  else
    {
      printf("Unknown engine %s.\n", id); exit(0);
    }

  eng->init(eng);
}

void Engine_run(Engine_t eng)
{
  eng->run(eng);
}

void Engine_set_algorithm(Engine_t eng, void *p)
{
  eng->p_algorithm = p;
}

void Engine_get_algorithm(Engine_t eng, void *p)
{
  p = eng->p_algorithm;
}

algorithm_one.h

typedef struct _A_one *A_one_t;

algorithm_one.c

#include "engine.h"
#include "algorithm_one.h"

typedef struct _A_one
{ 
  float value;
} A_one;

void Algorithm_one_init(Engine_t eng)
{
  A_one_t aone;
  aone = malloc(sizeof(A_one));
  aone->value = 13.0;

  //int var = 10;

  Engine_set_algorithm(eng, &aone);
}

void Algorithm_one_run(Engine_t eng)
{  
  A_one_t aone;
  Engine_get_algorithm(eng, &aone);

  printf("I am running algorithm one with value %f.\n", aone->value);
  // The code for algorithm one goes here.
}

The code for algorithm_two.h and algorithm_two.c are identical to the algorithm one files.

There must be a memory bug involved, because the code runs as given, but if I uncomment the

//int var = 10;

line in algoritm_one.c the code crashes with a segmentation fault.

share|improve this question
1  
Your Engine_get_algorithm function will not actually get anything, since p is local to the function. You need to either return the algorithm, or pass p by pointer. –  Sander De Dycker Jan 22 '13 at 11:13
    
Argh, a pointer typedef. This makes your code really hard to read. –  Jens Gustedt Jan 22 '13 at 12:32
    
@ Sander De Dycker Thanks, you are right, and I have made modifications according to the answer from David Heffernan. –  Erik_G Jan 22 '13 at 14:26
    
@JensGustedt If it was hard to write, it should be hard to read. ;) No, seriously, I think it is a good way to have a clear separation between the interface in .h and the implementation in .c. –  Erik_G Jan 22 '13 at 14:28
1  
Hm, this is just hiding things. In C when you see an interface without a * you are expecting things to be passed by value. In most projects such an interface wouldn't pass reviewing. –  Jens Gustedt Jan 22 '13 at 14:54
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You pass the wrong thing to Engine_set_algorithm. You are passing the address of a local variable rather than the address of the algorithm. You need to write:

Engine_set_algorithm(eng, aone);

And also Engine_get_algorithm is wrong. You are passed a pointer by value and modify that pointer. So the caller cannot see that modification. You need it to be:

void Engine_get_algorithm(Engine_t eng, void **p)
{
  *p = eng->p_algorithm;
}

I think your code would be easier if you defined a type to represent an algorithm. That type would be just a void*, but it would make the code much easier to read. What's more, I would make Engine_get_algorithm return the algorithm.

algorithm Engine_get_algorithm(Engine_t eng)
{
    return eng->p_algorithm;
}

void Engine_set_algorithm(Engine_t eng, algorithm alg)
{
    eng->p_algorithm = alg;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, you are right. I should have spotted that one myself. Your other suggestions are excellent as well. The code works as intended now. Defining an algorithm type for readability is definitely a good idea. Many humble thanks for a swift and concise answer. –  Erik_G Jan 22 '13 at 14:24
    
I'm glad that helped! And thanks for the accept. –  David Heffernan Jan 22 '13 at 15:05
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