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I am creating a table in oracle DB and trying to add constraint so that the numbers allowed in the column are 1,2,3.

CREATE TABLE "TABLE_EXAMPLE"
(
.
.
"PROTOCOL" NUMBER (1,2,3),

....)

CONSTRAINT "CH1"
        CHECK ("PROTOCOL" BETWEEN 1 AND 3),

Am I doing right or any better way?

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1  
There is no number(1,2,3) datatype in Oracle. –  a_horse_with_no_name Jan 22 '13 at 11:42
    
ButI have seen NUMBER (0,1) data type –  constantlearner Jan 22 '13 at 11:44
1  
NUMBER(0,1) isn't an enumeration. It's the number of digits, and the precision. –  Plouf Jan 22 '13 at 11:45
2  
@Plouf! number(0, 1) is simply wrong declaration, because numeric precision cannot be zero. –  Nicholas Krasnov Jan 22 '13 at 11:53
    
Oups, you're true. –  Plouf Jan 22 '13 at 11:55

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted
CREATE TABLE TABLE_EXAMPLE 
(
 ...
  PROTOCOL NUMBER(1) NOT NULL CONSTRAINT CH1 CHECK (PROTOCOL IN (1,2,3))
 ...
);

BETWEEN 1 AND 3 includes 1.5, 1.6, etc.

And I'd recommend not to use quotes " unless you have special characters in table or column names...

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whats the difference between NUMBER(1) and NUMBER(0,1) ? –  constantlearner Jan 22 '13 at 11:46
1  
The data type NUMBER takes two parameters NUMBER(p,s). The first one, p, is the precision, the second one, s is the scale. There are some examples in the documentation docs.oracle.com/cd/E11882_01/server.112/e26088/… –  wolφi Jan 22 '13 at 11:56

If you are going to check in the table level Check Constraint is the best way. because if you are inserting larger value then the check constraint ll throw the error.

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