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I've been messing with this and googling it for about 4 days and I'm getting crazy about how Hibernate annotations work with JPA annotations. I have two very simple entities:

Student

package com.vaannila.student;

import java.util.HashSet;
import java.util.Set;

import javax.persistence.Entity;
import javax.persistence.GeneratedValue;
import javax.persistence.Id;
import javax.persistence.JoinColumn;
import javax.persistence.JoinTable;
import javax.persistence.OneToMany;

import org.hibernate.annotations.Cascade;
import org.hibernate.annotations.CascadeType;

@Entity
public class Student {

    @Id
    @GeneratedValue
    private long studentId;
    private String studentName;
    @OneToMany(orphanRemoval = true)
    @Cascade(CascadeType.ALL)
    @JoinTable(name = "STUDENT_PHONE", joinColumns = { @JoinColumn(name = "STUDENT_ID") }, inverseJoinColumns = { @JoinColumn(name = "PHONE_ID") })
    private Set<Phone> studentPhoneNumbers = new HashSet<Phone>(0);

    public Student() {
    }

    public Student(String studentName, Set<Phone> studentPhoneNumbers) {
        this.studentName = studentName;
        this.studentPhoneNumbers = studentPhoneNumbers;
    }

    public long getStudentId() {
        return this.studentId;
    }

    public void setStudentId(long studentId) {
        this.studentId = studentId;
    }

    public String getStudentName() {
        return this.studentName;
    }

    public void setStudentName(String studentName) {
        this.studentName = studentName;
    }

    public Set<Phone> getStudentPhoneNumbers() {
        return this.studentPhoneNumbers;
    }

    public void setStudentPhoneNumbers(Set<Phone> studentPhoneNumbers) {
        this.studentPhoneNumbers = studentPhoneNumbers;
    }

    @Override
    public int hashCode() {
        final int prime = 31;
        int result = 1;
        result = prime * result + (int) (studentId ^ (studentId >>> 32));
        result = prime * result + ((studentName == null) ? 0 : studentName.hashCode());
        result = prime * result + ((studentPhoneNumbers == null) ? 0 : studentPhoneNumbers.hashCode());
        return result;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean equals(Object obj) {
        if (this == obj) return true;
        if (obj == null) return false;
        if (getClass() != obj.getClass()) return false;
        Student other = (Student) obj;
        if (studentId != other.studentId) return false;
        if (studentName == null) {
            if (other.studentName != null) return false;
        }
        else if (!studentName.equals(other.studentName)) return false;
        if (studentPhoneNumbers == null) {
            if (other.studentPhoneNumbers != null) return false;
        }
        else if (!studentPhoneNumbers.equals(other.studentPhoneNumbers)) return false;
        return true;
    }

}

Phone

package com.vaannila.student;

import javax.persistence.Entity;
import javax.persistence.GeneratedValue;
import javax.persistence.Id;

@Entity
public class Phone {

    @Id
    @GeneratedValue
    private long phoneId;
    private String phoneType;
    private String phoneNumber;

    public Phone() {
    }

    public Phone(String phoneType, String phoneNumber) {
        this.phoneType = phoneType;
        this.phoneNumber = phoneNumber;
    }

    public long getPhoneId() {
        return this.phoneId;
    }

    public void setPhoneId(long phoneId) {
        this.phoneId = phoneId;
    }

    public String getPhoneType() {
        return this.phoneType;
    }

    public void setPhoneType(String phoneType) {
        this.phoneType = phoneType;
    }

    public String getPhoneNumber() {
        return this.phoneNumber;
    }

    public void setPhoneNumber(String phoneNumber) {
        this.phoneNumber = phoneNumber;
    }

    @Override
    public int hashCode() {
        final int prime = 31;
        int result = 1;
        result = prime * result + (int) (phoneId ^ (phoneId >>> 32));
        result = prime * result + ((phoneNumber == null) ? 0 : phoneNumber.hashCode());
        result = prime * result + ((phoneType == null) ? 0 : phoneType.hashCode());
        return result;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean equals(Object obj) {
        if (this == obj) return true;
        if (obj == null) return false;
        if (getClass() != obj.getClass()) return false;
        Phone other = (Phone) obj;
        if (phoneId != other.phoneId) return false;
        if (phoneNumber == null) {
            if (other.phoneNumber != null) return false;
        }
        else if (!phoneNumber.equals(other.phoneNumber)) return false;
        if (phoneType == null) {
            if (other.phoneType != null) return false;
        }
        else if (!phoneType.equals(other.phoneType)) return false;
        return true;
    }

}

I've pasted the whole code here so you can see where the imports come from. I think the problem is there. Important: I'm using a JoinTable as Hibernate Docs recommends

Ok! Now I create a Student with two Phone numbers and save it correctly in the database. This creates the following:

student

 studentid | studentname
-----------+-------------
         2 | foo
(1 rows)

student_phone

 student_id | phone_id
------------+---------
          2 |        3
          2 |        4
(2 rows)

phone

 phoneid | phonenumber | phonetyp
---------+-------------+---------
       4 | 9889343423  | mobile
       3 | 32354353    | house
(2 rows)

Here comes the problem. If I delete one of the phone numbers (mobile) in client side and send the detached student entity to the server and perform an update, Hibernate to the following:

Hibernate: update Student set studentName=? where studentId=?
Hibernate: update Phone set phoneNumber=?, phoneType=? where phoneId=?
Hibernate: delete from STUDENT_PHONE where STUDENT_ID=?
Hibernate: insert into STUDENT_PHONE (STUDENT_ID, PHONE_ID) values (?, ?)

As you can see, it just deletes the entry in the join table but does not delete the phone entry itself in the phone table. So now the tables look like this:

student

 studentid | studentname
-----------+-------------
         2 | foo
(1 rows)

student_phone

 student_id | phone_id
------------+---------
          2 |        3
(1 rows)

phone

 phoneid | phonenumber | phonetyp
---------+-------------+---------
       4 | 9889343423  | mobile
       3 | 32354353    | house
(2 rows)

Question: Is that the normal behaviour? Even if cascading delete and orphan removal is set to true? How I can achieve that Hibernate delete the phone number in phone table too?

UPDATE I'm using PostgreSQL

share|improve this question
    
are you correctly setting the phone ids within the collection when sending it back? because this is not normal behavior and should be correctly deleted from the child table. –  dinukadev Jan 22 '13 at 12:21
    
That was something that happened me once, so is the first thing I checked. And yes, are correctly set –  hespresati Jan 22 '13 at 13:52

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

After further work with Hibernate finally I realise I wasn't implementing correctly equals and hashCode functions causing some troubles with Hibernate Generated Sequence on CRUD operations. The problem is described (and solved) in this great article (a must read, in my opinion)

Best regards

share|improve this answer

This looks very similar to

http://www.mkyong.com/hibernate/cascade-jpa-hibernate-annotation-common-mistake/

You are mixing JPA and hibernate annotations. I would stick with one (preferably JPA, but the blog posts sticks with hibernate) and had the relationship this way:

@OneToMany(cascade = CascadeType.ALL, orphanRemoval = true)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the tip, but doesn't work. I had done my homework before posting here and I tried that too. Best regards –  hespresati Feb 13 '13 at 15:20

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