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I have two classes A and B, B inheriting from A and additionally having a member of type List<OtherObject>.

Now I would need a reference to the List.Count property in class A reflecting changes that happen to the List in class B (removing/adding items). What's the best way to accomplish that, without changing the int member in class A by myself?

EDIT: OK, it is a little bit more complicate and I have some simplified code here for explanation: The int member myCount should hold the reference I was talking about.

public abstract class A{
protected int myCount;

    public void Process()
    {

        ProcessSpecificRequest();

        if(myCount == 0){
            //Do something
        }
    }

    protected abstract void ProcessSpecificRequest();

    }

public class B: A {
private List<Object> myList;

    protected override void ProcessSpecificRequest()
    {
    //Do something with the List

    }

}

share|improve this question
    
It'd be easier to see what you're talking about with some code. – Drew Noakes Jan 22 '13 at 12:48
    
What is "the int member in class A"? – Dennis Jan 22 '13 at 12:52
up vote 1 down vote accepted
class A {
    public abstract int ListCount { get; }
}

class B : A {
    protected List<object> BList = new List<object>();
    public override int ListCount {
        get {
            return BList.Count;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! Pretty simple, I should have found this by myself :) – hecko84 Jan 22 '13 at 13:14
public abstract class A, ICollection
{
    public abstract int Count { get; }
    //todo realize ICollection
}

public class B<T> : A
{
    protected List<T> OtherObject = new List<T>();
    public override int Count 
    {
        get
        {
            return OtherObject.Count;
        }
    }
    //todo realize ICollection
}
share|improve this answer

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