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I have a class called movie. Movie has a movieYear string property and movieYearInt int property. I want a class method where I can send the movie object and get an object back that has taken the movieYear string property and copied its value to movieYearInt. Later on I will be converting more properties of the object.

this is the movie class

 public class movie
{
    public string movieName { get; set; }
    public string movieYear { get; set; }
    public int movieYearInt { get; set; }

    public movie convertFilm(movie m)
    {
        m.movieYearInt = int.Parse(m.movieYear);
        return m;
    }
}

and this is how I thought of retrieving the object in my form

movie m = new movie();
m.movieYear = cmbMovieYear.ToString();  
movie newMovie = m.convertFilm(m);

The error i get is: input string was not in a correct format what am I doing wrong?

edit- This is the movieYear combobox

List<int> allYears = new List<int>();
allYears.AddRange(Enumerable.Range(1900, 113));
cmbMovieYear.DataSource = allYears;

edit-

m.movieYear = cmbMovieYear.SelectedItem.ToString();

This was the solution.

share|improve this question
3  
What was the value of cmbMovieYear.ToString()? –  RB. Jan 22 '13 at 12:58
    
Step through convertFilm and check the value of m.movieYear. You probably have a space or something that the parser doesn't like. –  Juann Strauss Jan 22 '13 at 13:00
    
Please provide an example of what is the input for movieYear. If it's something with points or something else in it, then int.Parse will fail. If you want to copy the existing movie, then inherit your class from ICloneable –  Tomtom Jan 22 '13 at 13:00
    
Sorry about that. updated the question and wrote what the cmbMovieYear is. –  Ashkan Aldini Jan 22 '13 at 13:21
    
No, you didn't, but never mind. We wanted to see where the variable "cmbMovieYear" was declared, not some more usage of it. –  Hoeloe Jan 22 '13 at 14:18

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Instead of returning a converted object, have you considered modifying the getter for your movieYearInt property to something like this?

  public int movieYearInt 
  {
    get
    {
      // add some validation, and consider using System.Int32.TryParse
      return System.Int32.Parse(movieYear);
    }      
  }
share|improve this answer
    
Although good advice, this does not actually answer his question of why his crash is occurring :) –  RB. Jan 22 '13 at 13:11
public class movie: ICloneable
{
    public string movieName { get; set; }
    public string movieYear { get; set; }
    public int movieYearInt { get { return int.Parse(movieYear) set {movieYear = value.ToString()}}

    public object Clone()
    {
        return new movie() {movieName = this.movieName, movieYear = this.movieYear};
    }
}

var m = new movie();
m.movieYear = "2001";
var newMovie = (movie) m.Clone();
share|improve this answer
    
Might want to check your syntax. You're missing a }. But yes, generally if you want to copy something, use the ICloneable interface. It's worth pointing out, however, that certain types of variables, like objects and arrays, are "reference" objects, and refer to a point in memory, not the object itself. When cloning an object, these references will be carried across, not a copy of the object, so make sure you call "Clone" recursively where necessary. –  Hoeloe Jan 22 '13 at 14:14
    
1) int.Parse can be replaced by int.TryParse 2) sorry, i typed code without checking... –  Armen Kazaryan Jan 22 '13 at 14:17
    
TryParse is not necessarily the desired behaviour, though. It does depend on the context of the program. –  Hoeloe Jan 22 '13 at 14:18

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