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I'm comparing 1D linear interpolation using a "standard" CUDA implementation and a "texture-based" CUDA implementation on complex numbers (float2).

The "standard" CUDA implementation comprises the following lines:

/*************************************/
/* LINEAR INTERPOLATION KERNEL - GPU */
/*************************************/
__device__ float linear_kernel_GPU(float in)
{
    float d_y;
    return 1.-abs(in);
}

/**********************************************/
/* LINEAR INTERPOLATION KERNEL FUNCTION - GPU */
/**********************************************/
__global__ void linear_interpolation_kernel_function_GPU(float2* result_d, float2* data_d, float* x_in_d, float* x_out_d, int M, int N)
{
    int j = threadIdx.x + blockDim.x * blockIdx.x;

    if(j<N)
    {
        result_d[j].x = 0.;
        result_d[j].y = 0.;
        for(int k=0; k<M; k++)
        {
            if (fabs(x_out_d[j]-x_in_d[k])<1.) {
                result_d[j].x = result_d[j].x + linear_kernel_GPU(x_out_d[j]-x_in_d[k])*data_d[k].x;
                result_d[j].y = result_d[j].y + linear_kernel_GPU(x_out_d[j]-x_in_d[k])*data_d[k].y; }
        }  
    } 
}

extern "C" void linear_interpolation_function_GPU(cuComplex* result_d, cuComplex* data_d, float* x_in_d, float* x_out_d, int M, int N){

    dim3 dimBlock(BLOCK_SIZE,1); dim3 dimGrid(N/BLOCK_SIZE + (N%BLOCK_SIZE == 0 ? 0:1),1);
    linear_interpolation_kernel_function_GPU<<<dimGrid,dimBlock>>>(result_d, data_d, x_in_d, x_out_d, M, N);

}

The "texture-based" CUDA implementation comprises the following lines:

texture<float2, 1, cudaReadModeElementType> data_d_texture;

// ********************************************************/
// * LINEAR INTERPOLATION KERNEL FUNCTION - GPU - TEXTURE */
// ********************************************************/
__global__ void linear_interpolation_kernel_function_GPU_texture(cuComplex* result_d, float* x_out_d, int M, int N)
{
    int j = threadIdx.x + blockDim.x * blockIdx.x;

    if(j<N) result_d[j] = tex1D(data_d_texture,float(x_out_d[j]+M/2+0.5));

}

// *************************************************/
// * LINEAR INTERPOLATION FUNCTION - GPU - TEXTURE */
// *************************************************/
extern "C" void linear_interpolation_function_GPU_texture(float2* result_d, float2* data, float* x_in_d, float* x_out_d, int M, int N){

    cudaArray* data_d = NULL; cudaMallocArray (&data_d, &data_d_texture.channelDesc, M, 1); 
    cudaMemcpyToArray(data_d, 0, 0, data, sizeof(float2)*M, cudaMemcpyHostToDevice); 
    cudaBindTextureToArray(data_d_texture, data_d); 
    data_d_texture.normalized = false; 
    data_d_texture.filterMode = cudaFilterModeLinear;

    dim3 dimBlock(BLOCK_SIZE,1); dim3 dimGrid(N/BLOCK_SIZE + (N%BLOCK_SIZE == 0 ? 0:1),1);
    linear_interpolation_kernel_function_GPU_texture<<<dimGrid,dimBlock>>>(result_d, x_out_d, M, N);

}

The "texture-based" interpolation is more than 20 times faster than the "standard" one. However, I noticed some mismatch in the results, with a root mean square error between the two implementations of about 0.07%.

The CUDA C Programming Guide says that the interpolation coefficients are stored in 9-bit fixed point format with 8 bits of fractional value, which may be the cause for that mismatch.

I have then two questions:

1) Is there any "trick" to enhance the accuracy of the "texture-based" interpolation?

2) I think that this 9-bits representation would limit the accuracy to that here obtained even if I move to float4, right? In other words, there would be no point in enhancing the number representation accuracy from float2 to float4?

Thanks in advance.

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1 Answer

You could "pre-interpolate" your texture to increase your resolution, i.e. if your initial texture is 100x100 then you can pre-interpolate to make it 200x200, then you've doubled the resolution of the in-kernel interpolation.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Tom, but how should I "pre-interpolate"? –  JackOLantern Jan 22 '13 at 15:15
    
By "pre-interpolate" I mean run a kernel to pre-process the data, doing a simple bilinear interpolation (or whatever interpolation you want), so in 1D if I have "a b c" then I create "a (a+b)/2 b (b+c)/2 c" etc. The assumption is that the one-off cost of pre-processing is amortized by the much large cost of the real interpolation. –  Tom Jan 22 '13 at 15:19
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