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I'm using the following to output the result of an upload speed test

wput 10MB.zip ftp://user:pass@host 2>&1 | grep '\([0-9.]\+[KM]/s\)'

which returns

18:14:38 (10MB.zip) - '10.49M/s' [10485760]
Transfered 10,485,760 bytes in 1 file at 10.23M/s

I'd like to have the result 10.23M/s (i.e. the speed) echoed, and a comparison result:

if speed=>5 MB/s then echo "pass" else echo "fail"

So, the final output would be:

PASS 7 M/s 

23/01/2013

ideally i'd like it all done on a single line so far i've got

wput 100M.bin ftp://test:test@0.0.0.0 2>&1 | grep -o '\([0-9.]\+[KM]/s\)$' | awk ' { if (($1 > 5) && ($2 == "M/s")) { printf("FAST %s\n ", $0); }}'

however it doesn't output anything if I remove

&& ($2 == "M/s"))

it works but I obviously want to it output above 5M/s and as it is it would still echo fast if it was over 1K/s. Can someone tell me what i've missed.

share|improve this question

Using awk:

# Over 5M/s
$ cat pass
18:14:38 (10MB.zip) - '10.49M/s' [10485760]
Transfered 10,485,760 bytes in 1 file at 10.23M/s

$ awk 'END{f="FAIL "$NF;p="PASS "$NF;if($NF~/K\/s/){print f;exit};gsub(/M\/s/,"");print(int($NF)>5?p:f)}' pass
PASS 10.23M/s

# Under 5M/s
$ cat fail
18:14:38 (10MB.zip) - '3.49M/s' [10485760]
Transfered 10,485,760 bytes in 1 file at 3.23M/s 

$ awk 'END{f="FAIL "$NF;p="PASS "$NF;if($NF~/K\/s/){print f;exit};gsub(/M\/s/,"");print(int($NF)>5?p:f)}' fail
FAIL 3.23M/s

# Also Handle K/s 
$ cat slow
18:14:38 (10MB.zip) - '3.49M/s' [10485760]
Transfered 10,485,760 bytes in 1 file at 8.23K/s

$ awk 'END{f="FAIL "$NF;p="PASS "$NF;if($NF~/K\/s/){print f;exit};gsub(/M\/s/,"");print(int($NF)>5?p:f)}' slow

FAIL 8.23K/s

Not sure where you get 7 M/s from?

share|improve this answer

According to @Rubens, you can use grep -o with your regex to show the speed, just append $ for end of line

wput 10MB.zip ftp://user:pass@host 2>&1 | grep -o '\([0-9.]\+[KM]/s\)$'

With perl you can easily do the remaining stuff

use strict;
use warnings;

while (<>) {
    if (m!\s+((\d+\.\d+)([KM])/s)$!) {
        if ($2 > 5 && $3 eq 'M') {
            print "PASS $1\n";
        } else {
            print "FAIL $1\n";
        }
    }
}

and then call it

wput 10MB.zip ftp://user:pass@host 2>&1 | perl script.pl
share|improve this answer
1  
Yes, you can use grep to do so; just use grep -o. – Rubens Jan 22 '13 at 14:33
1  
@Rubens +1 for teaching me something new – Olaf Dietsche Jan 22 '13 at 14:34
    
This doesn't answer the question it just prints the speed (as @Rubens points out can be done with the addition of -o to grep) – iiSeymour Jan 22 '13 at 14:40
    
@sudo_O You're right, fixed. – Olaf Dietsche Jan 22 '13 at 14:53
    
main post updated – Lurch Jan 23 '13 at 11:05

This is an answer to the question update.

With the awk program, you haven't split the speed into numeric and unit value. It is just one string.

Because fast speed is greater than 5 M/s, you can ignore K/s and extract the speed by splitting at the character M. Then you have the speed in $1 and can compare it

wput 100M.bin ftp://test:test@0.0.0.0 2>&1 | grep -o '[0-9.]\+M/s$' | awk -F '/M/' '{ if ($1 > 5) { printf("FAST %s\n ", $0); }}'
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