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I've been experiencing a similar problem to (Too many open file handles) when I try to run a program on a Grid Computer. The option of increasing the operating system limit for the total number of open files on this resource is unavailable.

I tried to catch and handle the exception, but catching the exception does not seem to happen. The exception seems to report itself as a FileNotFoundException. One of the places the exception is thrown is in the method shown below:

public static void saveImage(BufferedImage bi, String format, File aFile) {
  try {
    if (bi != null) {
      try {
        //System.out.println("ImageIO.write(BufferedImage,String,File)");
        System.err.println("Not really an error, just a statement to help with debugging");
        ImageIO.write(bi, format, aFile);
      } catch (FileNotFoundException e) {
        System.err.println("Trying to handle " + e.getLocalizedMessage());
        System.err.println("Wait for 2 seconds then trying again to saveImage.");
        //e.printStackTrace(System.err);
        // This can happen because of too many open files.
        // Try waiting for 2 seconds and then repeating...
        try {
          synchronized (bi) {
            bi.wait(2000L);
          }
        } catch (InterruptedException ex) {
          Logger.getLogger(Generic_Visualisation.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE, null, ex);
        }
        saveImage(
        bi,
        format,
        aFile);
      } finally {
        // There is nothing to go in here as ImageIO deals with the stream.    
      }
    }
  } catch (IOException e) {
    Generic_Log.logger.log(
    Generic_Log.Generic_DefaultLogLevel, //Level.ALL,
    e.getMessage());
    String methodName = "saveImage(BufferedImage,String,File)";
    System.err.println(e.getMessage());
    System.err.println("Generic_Visualisation." + methodName);
    e.printStackTrace(System.err);
    System.exit(Generic_ErrorAndExceptionHandler.IOException);
  }
}

Here is a snippet from System.err reported one time when the problem occurs:

Not really an error, just a statement to help with debugging   
java.io.FileNotFoundException: /data/scratch/lcg/neiss140/home_cream_292126297/CREAM292126297/genesis/GENESIS_DemographicModel/0_99/0/data/Demographics/0_9999/0_99/39/E02002367/E02002367_Population_Male_End_of_Year_Comparison_2002.PNG (Too many open files) 
  at java.io.RandomAccessFile.open(Native Method)
  at java.io.RandomAccessFile.(RandomAccessFile.java:216) 
  at javax.imageio.stream.FileImageOutputStream.(FileImageOutputStream.java:53) 
  at com.sun.imageio.spi.FileImageOutputStreamSpi.createOutputStreamInstance(FileImageOutputStreamSpi.java:37) 
  at javax.imageio.ImageIO.createImageOutputStream(ImageIO.java:393) 
  at javax.imageio.ImageIO.write(ImageIO.java:1514) 
  at uk.ac.leeds.ccg.andyt.generic.visualisation.Generic_Visualisation.saveImage(Generic_Visualisation.java:90) 
  at uk.ac.leeds.ccg.andyt.generic.visualisation.Generic_Visualisation$ImageSaver.run(Generic_Visualisation.java:210) 
  at java.util.concurrent.Executors$RunnableAdapter.call(Executors.java:439) 
  at java.util.concurrent.FutureTask$Sync.innerRun(FutureTask.java:303) 
  at java.util.concurrent.FutureTask.run(FutureTask.java:138) 
  at java.util.concurrent.ThreadPoolExecutor$Worker.runTask(ThreadPoolExecutor.java:886) 
  at java.util.concurrent.ThreadPoolExecutor$Worker.run(ThreadPoolExecutor.java:908) 
  at java.lang.Thread.run(Thread.java:662)

I have some ideas for working around this issue, but does anyone know what is wrong?

(I tried to post a version of this question as an answer to this question, but this was deleted by a moderator.)

share|improve this question
    
If your try clause is not appearing to catch the exception, it could be because you've referenced the wrong class. Are you definitely catching the FileNotFoundException from java.io? –  Duncan Jan 22 '13 at 14:42
    
Thanks Duncan. I suspected that I should be catching a different exception. I think I can check what exception was making the program choke, so I should do that and report back. Steven has suggested that I should be catching javax.imageio.IIOException, so I am trying that. Thanks again for your suggestion. –  Andy Turner Jan 22 '13 at 15:25
    
BTW I was catching java.io.FileNotFoundException thanks @DuncanJones –  Andy Turner Jan 28 '13 at 16:28

1 Answer 1

Firstly, the write method will actually throw an IIOException not a FileNotFoundException if it fails to open the output stream; see the source - line 1532. That explains why your recovery code never runs.

Second, your recovery strategy is a bit dubious. You have no guarantee that whatever is using all of those file handles is going to release them in 2 seconds. Indeed, in the worst case, they may never be released.

But the most important thing is that you are focussing on the wrong part of the problem. Rather than trying to come up with a recovery mechanism, you should focus on the problem of why the application has so many file descriptors open. This smells like a resource leak. I recommend that you run FindBugs over your codebase to see if it can identify the leaky code. Everywhere your code opens an external Stream, it should have a matching close() call in a finally block to ensures that the stream is always closed; e.g.

    OutputStream os = new FileOutputStream(...)
    try {
        // do stuff
    } finally {
        os.close();
    }

or

    // Java 7 form ...
    try (OutputStream os = new FileOutputStream(...)) {
        // do stuff
    }

The resource I am running this on has only 1024 file handlers and changing that is another issue. The program is a simulation and it writes out a large number of output files at the same time as it reads in another lot of input data. That work is threaded using an ExecutorService. The program runs to completion on another computer that has a higher file hander limit, but I want to get it to work on the resource where I am limited to having less file handlers.

So it seems like you are saying that you need to have that number of files open.

It strikes me that the root problem is in your application's architecture. It sounds like you simply have too many simulation tasks running at the same time. I suggest that you reduce the executor's thread pool size to a few less than the max number of open file descriptors.

The problem is that your current strategy could lead to a form of deadlock ... where existing tasks can't make progress until new tasks start running, but the new tasks can't start until existing tasks release file descriptors.

I'm thinking you need a different approach to handling the input and output. Either buffer the complete input and/or output files in memory (etcetera) or implement some kind of multiplexor so that all active files doesn't need to be open at the same time.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that is helpful. I will try catching IIOException and see if my handling works. The resource I am running this on has only 1024 file handlers and changing that is another issue. The program is a simulation and it writes out a large number of output files at the same time as it reads in another lot of input data. That work is threaded using an ExecutorService. The program runs to completion on another computer that has a higher file hander limit, but I want to get it to work on the resource where I am limited to having less file handlers. Thanks again. –  Andy Turner Jan 22 '13 at 15:11
    
P.S. I am confident I am closing open streams correctly, but thanks for pointing me to FindBugs (findbugs.sourceforge.net) it looks like a useful resource. –  Andy Turner Jan 22 '13 at 15:29
    
@StephenC How do you explain the FileNotFoundException in the stack trace? –  Duncan Jan 22 '13 at 15:30
1  
@DuncanJones - either he's using a different version of Java (that doesn't catch IOException and wrap it) or he's only shown us a partial stacktrace. I suspect the latter. –  Stephen C Jan 22 '13 at 22:56
    
As well as catching FileNotFoundException, I also tried catching IIOException and using the same handling. I plan to try again catching also the general IOException too and doing the same handling, but I expect this to fail too. I will confirm java versions and provide links to a complete stack trace shortly. –  Andy Turner Jan 23 '13 at 10:07

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