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I have another data manipulation question. So I have this .gtf file of tab delimited data and I need to extract certain features. This was simpler before when all I had to do was extract the gene ID, POS1 and POS2 for each "exon" type in each gene. I need to do the same thing, however I first need to find POS1 and POS2 of each exon relative to its position within the gene. Right now the columns POS1 and POS2 are numbered based upon the location of TYPE on the whole genome (which is why the numbers are so high). There is also another catch, if the strand is -, this is reversed. If you look at PITG_00002, you can see that the stop codon appears to be before the start codon. This is because everything is numbered relative to the + (template) strand. So here is a sample of the data sheet:

GENE ID     TYPE        POS1    POS2    STRAND
PITG_00003  start_codon 38775   38777   +   0
PITG_00003  stop_codon  39069   39071   +   0
PITG_00003  exon        38775   39071   +   .
PITG_00003  CDS         38775   39068   +   0
PITG_00004  start_codon 39526   39528   +   0
PITG_00004  stop_codon  41492   41494   +   0
PITG_00004  exon        39526   40416   +   .
PITG_00004  CDS         39526   40416   +   0
PITG_00004  exon        40486   40771   +   .
PITG_00004  CDS         40486   40771   +   0
PITG_00004  exon        40827   41494   +   .
PITG_00004  CDS         40827   41491   +   2
PITG_00002  start_codon 10520   10522   -   0
PITG_00002  stop_codon  10097   10099   -   0
PITG_00002  exon        10474   10522   -   .
PITG_00002  CDS         10474   10522   -   0
PITG_00002  exon        10171   10433   -   .
PITG_00002  CDS         10171   10433   -   2
PITG_00002  exon        10097   10114   -   .
PITG_00002  CDS         10100   10114   -   0

So for each gene I need to start the number over at 1 relative to the position of the "start codon" TYPE. Unfortunately, the number is backwards for the Genes listed on the - STRAND (PITG_00002, for example). So for these cases, the numbering needs to start at 1 relative to POS2 of start_codon and end at POS1 of exon.

so for each exon I need to get a new POS1 and POS2, which I will call POSA and POSB.

To get POSA for each exon I would do:

POS1 of "exon" - POS1 of "start_codon" + 1 = POSA

To get POSB for each exon I would do:

POS2 of "exon" - POS1 of "start_codon" + 1 = POSB

Using PITG_00004 as an example:

POSA = 39526-39526 + 1 = 1
POSB = 40416 - 39526 + 1 = 891

And then just do the same thing for each exon in each gene, using that gene's start_codon positions to reset the numbering. Except in the case of the negative strand, in which case I have to do:

To get POSA for each exon I would do:

POS2 of "start_codon" - POS2 of "exon" + 1 = POSA

To get POSB for each exon I would do:

POS1 of "start_codon" - POS1 of "exon" + 1 = POSB

Ultimately I'd like to get this:

PITG_00002 exon 1 49
PITG_00002 exon 90 352
PITG_00002 exon 409 426
PITG_00003 exon 1 297
PITG_00004 exon 1 891
PITG_00004 exon 961 1246
PITG_00004 exon 1302 1969

I'm not really sure how to do this one way for the + strand and another way for the - strand. I've been using python more often of late, but I can do perl as well.

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closed as too localized by martineau, Nifle, esac, paddy, Graviton Jan 27 '13 at 8:34

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2  
Please post what you've tried –  Zaid Jan 22 '13 at 14:53
    
This can be easily done with the pandas library, but before writing the code, I'm not sure how the file is formatted. What you posted is a mess of whitespaces without any clear separation. The last two values for each row are both part of the STRAND column? Can you correct it into a csv (comma separated values) format? –  EnricoGiampieri Jan 22 '13 at 15:12
    
@EnricoGiampieri the question says they are tab-separated –  ysth Jan 22 '13 at 15:26

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Perl solution. Use a hash to store the information about each gene. The @idxs array is used to avoid repeating the formulae.

#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict;
use feature qw(switch);

my %hash;
<>;                   # Skip header.
while (<>) {
    my ($id, $type, $pos1, $pos2, $strand, undef) = split;
    given ($type) {
        when ('start_codon') {
            $hash{$id}{start}  = [$pos1, $pos2];
            $hash{$id}{strand} = $strand;
        }
        when ('stop_codon') {
            $hash{$id}{stop}  = [$pos1, $pos2];
        }
        when ('exon') {
            push @{ $hash{$id}{exons} }, [$pos1, $pos2];
        }
    }
}

for my $id (sort keys %hash) {
    my @idxs = '+' eq $hash{$id}{strand} ? (0, 1) : (1, 0);
    for my $exon (@{ $hash{$id}{exons} }) {
        my $posa = 1 + abs $hash{$id}{start}[$idxs[0]] - $exon->[$idxs[0]];
        my $posb = 3 + abs $hash{$id}{start}[$idxs[1]] - $exon->[$idxs[1]];
        print "$id exon $posa $posb\n";
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Wow, I was really just looking for a push in the right direction but this works as well haha. Thanks for the post. Can I ask why you used $posb = 3 + abs .... for the calculation of posb? –  user1784467 Jan 23 '13 at 20:08
    
@user1784467: Because I wanted to have the same results as per the specification. –  choroba Jan 24 '13 at 8:55

Ok, here is the solution to your problem (at least for what I've understood): It is based on the pandas library ( http://pandas.pydata.org/ ), the present golden standard for data analysis in python.

first of all load your data:

data = pd.read_csv('genetest.csv', sep='\t',
                   converters={'STRAND': lambda s: s[0]})

the converted is just stripping the extra characters out of the strand column, leaving only + or -.

now you go and use the groupby function to separate the your sequences by strand direction and gene name

groups = data.groupby(['STRAND', 'GENE_ID'])

This will return your dataset in pieces with the same strand direction and gene name, and you can work on each of them separatly. So we iterate over them as the items of a dictionary (a list of key,value pairs) and operate on them.

corrected = []
for (direction, gene_name), group in groups:
    print direction,gene_name
    # take the index of the element you are going to subtract to the others
    start_exon = group.index[group.TYPE=='start_codon'][0]
    # now you perform your normalization and put it back into your group
    if direction == '+':
        group['POSA'] = 1 + group.POS1 - group.POS1[start_exon]
        group['POSB'] = 1 + group.POS2 - group.POS1[start_exon]
    else:
        group['POSA'] = 1 - group.POS2 + group.POS2[start_exon]
        group['POSB'] = 1 - group.POS1 + group.POS2[start_exon]
    print group
    # put into the result array
    corrected.append(group)
# join them together to obtain the whole dataset with the POSA and POSB
new_data = pd.concat(corrected)
print new_data

and this is what you obtain:

    GENE_ID     TYPE    POS1    POS2    STRAND  POSA    POSB
0   PITG_00003  start_codon     38775   38777   +   1   3
1   PITG_00003  stop_codon  39069   39071   +   295     297
2   PITG_00003  exon    38775   39071   +   1   297
3   PITG_00003  CDS     38775   39068   +   1   294
4   PITG_00004  start_codon     39526   39528   +   1   3
5   PITG_00004  stop_codon  41492   41494   +   1967    1969
6   PITG_00004  exon    39526   40416   +   1   891
7   PITG_00004  CDS     39526   40416   +   1   891
8   PITG_00004  exon    40486   40771   +   961     1246
9   PITG_00004  CDS     40486   40771   +   961     1246
10  PITG_00004  exon    40827   41494   +   1302    1969
11  PITG_00004  CDS     40827   41491   +   1302    1966
12  PITG_00002  start_codon     10520   10522   -   1   3
13  PITG_00002  stop_codon  10097   10099   -   424     426
14  PITG_00002  exon    10474   10522   -   1   49
15  PITG_00002  CDS     10474   10522   -   1   49
16  PITG_00002  exon    10171   10433   -   90  352
17  PITG_00002  CDS     10171   10433   -   90  352
18  PITG_00002  exon    10097   10114   -   409     426
19  PITG_00002  CDS     10100   10114   -   409     423

By the way, you wrote down the wrong distance correction in the question, it shoud be

POS1 of "start_codon" - POS2 of "exon" + 1 = POSB

for the inverted string to have geometrical sense (and to obtain the value you posted)

share|improve this answer
    
Hey thanks for the post. It took me awhile to get pandas set up, some bug with setuptools while trying to configure its dependencies. Pandas looks real nice, but I can't get this to run. Do I need to import pandas.io.parsers.read_csv? When I don't do that I get an error about an unexpected token '(' at the line with the data = pd.read_csv('genetest.csv', sep='\t', converters={'STRAND': lambda s: s[0]}) but when I do and I try to run the script, it converts my mouse into some kind of select tool and takes a screen shot of what I click on, saving it in the folder? Odd... –  user1784467 Jan 23 '13 at 20:10
    
Ok, that's new to me :) Pandas should be quite easy to install along with all the dependencies with pip install pandas. About the script going crazy...I havent' honestly the slightest idea. What OS are you using? windows? –  EnricoGiampieri Jan 24 '13 at 0:38
    
I was running it on Ubuntu. I tried it on windows, python 2.7.3 and it seems to run, but I getting an index error: File "C:\Python27\lib\site-packages\pandas\core\index.py", line 196, in __getitem__ return arr_idx[key] IndexError: index out of bounds but at least it's running now! –  user1784467 Jan 25 '13 at 3:03

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