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guided by some Tutorials I've been trying to get a simple Scala Actor example working where i send a (String-)message to an actor and that actor replies with an output to the console. My code is:

import scala.io.Source
import scala.actors.Actor

object ProtTest {

  class testActor extends Actor {
    def receive = { 
      case "you" => Console.println("Hello you!")
      case _ => Console.println ("Hello ???")
    }
  }

  val t = new testActor
  t ! "you"
}

Unfortunately I get the following error message on "def receive = {" and been stuck on it for quite a while now:

Missing parameter type for expanded function 
The argument types of an anonymous function must be fully known (SLS 8.5)
Expected Type was: ?

I really have no idea what the question mark in the error message means and how to fix the example so it'll work?!

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1  
There's little to no reason to use the old Scala standard-library actors. Use Akka actors (which are the new standard-library actors in Scala 2.10 and onward). Akka' actors are in every way an improvement over the old ones. –  Randall Schulz Jan 22 '13 at 16:03

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It looks like you're getting a bit confused about actor implementations. Your testActor code is valid for an Akka actor, but you are using the Scala actors library.

Akka and scala.actors are two distinct implementations of the actor model. Scala actors were the original implementation, but Akka is now more popular (and far superior IMO) and as of Scala 2.10 is the standard implementation bundled with Scala (scala.actors exists but is deprecated in 2.10).

I actually don't know how to properly implement a scala actor, but here's how to get your actor running in Akka:

import akka.actor._

object ProtTest {

  class testActor extends Actor {
    def receive = { 
      case "you" => Console.println("Hello you!")
      case _ => Console.println ("Hello ???")
    }

    override def postStop() {
      context.system.shutdown
    }
  }

  val system = ActorSystem("test")
  val t = system.actorOf(Props[testActor])
  t ! "you"
  t ! PoisonPill
  system.awaitTermination

}

As you can see, Akka requires a little boilerplate to properly setup and shutdown an actor system, but your main actor code is unchanged. the postStop method is called after the actor shuts down, which occurs when the actor receives the PoisonPill message.

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Hello, yeah i Guess i got a little bit mixed up with that two kinds of implementation. I was reading the Akka Documentation and mixed it up with some Tutorials about the Scala Actors. Thanks for pointing out my mistake! –  AvantiC Jan 22 '13 at 16:33

receive isn't the method you implement. You need to implement act, in when you call receive:

  class testActor extends Actor {
    def act = {
      while (true) {
        receive {
          case "you" => Console.println("Hello you!")
          case _ => Console.println ("Hello ???")
        }
      }
    }
  }

So receive is a method that you call. The argument you pass to it is the block of code with {..} which contains the case clauses. The type of this argument is a partial function - in your case, a function from String (which scala infers because "you" is a string) to Unit (scala's version of void which is what println returns).

(See Twitters' Scala School for a good explanation of how a partial functions are equivalent to a bunch of case statements).

The compile error messages are quite easy to understand once you've grokked the basic scala concepts - in this case knowing how anonymous functions and the _ shorthand behave may be necessary.

Also, you'll need to start your actor instance with t.start if you want it to receive messages.

While not deprecated yet, most people (as the other answer points out) favor Akka actors. Since Scala 2.10, scala.actors.Actor is deprecated in favor of Akka actors.

(As a side note, if you want that code to work you'll also need to either declare ProtTest as extending App or move the calling t ! "you" to a class (or object) with a main method)

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I work more with Akka than Scala's actor system, but... here's a short tutorial; you can see from the examples there that the receive block should be inside a loop (for example while (true) {...}), inside an def act() method.

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