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I'm pretty new to Python, so I apologize if my problem is amateurish.

I'm trying to make a simple program that allows a user to see UDP messages that are being broadcast. In order for the program to not lock up, I of course need to create a separate thread to listen for the broadcast.

Before I attempted to implement threading, the program worked great. It just waited for UDP messages and displayed them in the TextView when it received one. Of course, this locked up the main thread.

Here is my code: (Yes, I know there are several irrelevant issues with my code, but please ignore them. e.g., I never close the socket. I will address these issues later.)

import socket
import select
import sys
import threading

try:
    import pygtk
    pygtk.require("2.0")
except:
    pass
try:
    import gtk
except:
    print("GTK not available!")
    sys.exit(1)


class GUI:
    def __init__(self):
        self.builder = gtk.Builder()
        self.builder.add_from_file("UDPListener.ui")
        dic = {"on_mainWindow_destroy" : self.quit,
             "on_listenButton_clicked" : self.startThread,
         "on_stopListenButton_clicked" : self.stopListening}
        self.builder.connect_signals(dic)

        self.listenerThread = threading.Thread(target = self.listen)

    def startThread(self, widget):
        self.listenerThread.start()

    def listen(self):
        bufferSize = 1024                                                          
        IPAddress = "0.0.0.0"
        IPAddress: 0.0.0.0
        portNumber = 50000
        udpClient = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_DGRAM)

        textView = self.builder.get_object("messagesReceivedEntry").get_buffer()
        textView.text = textView.get_text(textView.get_start_iter(),textView.get_end_iter())

        textView.set_text("Listening...")

        try:
            udpClient.bind((IPAddress, portNumber))
            udpClient.setblocking(0)
        except:
            print "Cannot connect."

        try:
            while True:
                result = select.select([udpClient],[],[])
                message = result[0][0].recv(bufferSize)
                print message
        except:
            print "Cannot receive message"

    def quit(self, widget):
        sys.exit(0)

    def stopListening(self, widget):
        pass

gui = GUI()
gtk.main() 

The code will run and everything runs ok, but it never prints any messages (I broadcast them myself).


UPDATE:

Thanks to J.F. Sebastian's answer, I altered my code to include the following:

import socket
import select
import sys
import threading
import gobject

try:
    import pygtk
    pygtk.require("2.0")
except:
    pass
try:
    import gtk
except:
    print("GTK not available!")
    sys.exit(1)

gobject.threads_init()

class GUI:
    def __init__(self, UDPClient):
        self.udpClient = UDPClient

        self.builder = gtk.Builder()
        self.builder.add_from_file("TestUDPListenerREORG.ui")
        dic = {"on_mainWindow_destroy" : self.quit,
             "on_listenButton_clicked" : self.startThread,
         "on_stopListenButton_clicked" : self.stopListening}
        self.builder.connect_signals(dic)

        self.textView = self.builder.get_object("messagesReceivedEntry").get_buffer()
        self.textViewText = self.textView.get_text(self.textView.get_start_iter(),self.textView.get_end_iter())

        self.listening = False
        self.listenerThread = threading.Thread(target = self.listen)

    def startThread(self, widget):
        self.listenerThread.start()
        pass

    def listen(self):
        try:
            self.udpClient.connect()
        except:
            print "Cannot connect."
        try:
            while True:
                result = select.select([self.udpClient.client],[],[])
                message = result[0][0].recv(1024)
                print message
                gobject.idle_add(self.updateGUI, message)
        except:
            print "Cannot receive message"

    def updateGUI(self, message):
        print "updating..."
        self.textView.set_text(self.textViewText + "\n" + message)
        print message

    def quit(self, widget):
        self.udpClient.close()
        sys.exit(0)

    def stopListening(self, widget):
        pass



class UDPClient:
    def __init__(self, IPAddress, portNumber):
        self.IPAddress = IPAddress
        self.portNumber = portNumber
        self.bufferSize = 1024

        self.client = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_DGRAM)

    def connect(self):
        try:
            self.client.bind((self.IPAddress, self.portNumber))
            self.client.setblocking(0)
        except: print "Cannot connect."

    def close(self):
        try:
            self.client.close()
        except:
            pass

udpClient = UDPClient("0.0.0.0", 50000)
gui = GUI(udpClient)
gtk.main() 

So far everything runs perfectly.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The model I find that works well for multithreaded gtk applications is to run all GUI code in the main thread. The only method from gtk that is run in a background thread is gobject.idle_add() to schedule gui callbacks to be executed in the main thread.

Put gobject.threads_init() somewhere at the top of the module before you run any other gtk code.

Here's an example for Gtk 3 but the principle is the same for Gtk 2. Another example.

An alternative is to use something like gobject.io_add_watch() and avoid using multiple threads.

share|improve this answer
    
That was so simple, thank you. –  Jordan Carroll Jan 22 '13 at 16:34
    
@Jordan.CarrollCS: it is not enough to add gobject.threads_init() if you run arbitrary GUI code in the background thread. Look at the examples I provided where it is enough. Read Multi-threaded GTK applications – Part 1: Misconceptions otherwise. –  J.F. Sebastian Jan 23 '13 at 1:17
    
I implemented the new changes. Could you explain why it is "not enough" and verify I have implemented your suggestions correctly? I really appreciate your help. –  Jordan Carroll Jan 23 '13 at 15:43
    
@Jordan.CarrollCS: The code related to thread-handling is ok. See the faq for the explanation. Other code have some issues unrelated to the question e.g., missing self. in the quit(). –  J.F. Sebastian Jan 23 '13 at 16:25
    
I know there are other problems in the code, I am only worried about the threading right now. Thanks again for the help. –  Jordan Carroll Jan 23 '13 at 16:32

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