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I'm attempting to make a query for an in-house customer of mine. I have two tables A and B. A stores all sales transaction data for an entire month. B stores all sales transaction data for an entire month for a specific dept (in a slightly different form).

The results the customer wants are all check #s from table B, plus any check #s in table A that match any of the check #s in table B AND have a T_ID value of 1, 2, or 3.

Note: In both A and B, the check # can have multiple entries.

I think I have the query right (??) but the customer is telling me it "doesn't look right" (Specifically, he's saying that we're pulling in too many records from Table A).

I'm not confident enough in my SQL to dispute him (and this query returns several thousand rows), so I was wondering if anyone could give the query below a once over and let me know where I'm going wrong?

This is run on MS SQL Server 2000.

SELECT  
        A.T_ID, 
        A.check_number,
        A.check_type_id,
        A.cashier_id,
        A.terminal_id,
        A.first_tender,
        A.tendered_date_time,
        A.tender_amount,
        A.change_amount,
        A.net_tender_amount,
        A.currency_received,
        B.account_name,
        B.account_number
FROM tCTD AS A
INNER JOIN tGAAAD AS B
        ON A.check_number = B.check_number
WHERE EXISTS 
    (   SELECT * 
        FROM tCTD 
        WHERE check_number = A.check_number 
        AND T_ID IN (1, 2, 3)
    );
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Shouldn't the where clause inside the EXISTS statement be WHERE check_number = B.check_number ?? –  Dimi Toulakis Jan 22 '13 at 15:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The results the customer wants are all check #s from table B, plus any check #s in table A that match any of the check #s in table B AND have a T_ID value of 1, 2, or 3.

A left join seems to fit the bill, with table B as the left side:

FROM tGAAAD AS B
LEFT JOIN tCTD AS A
ON A.check_number = B.check_number
   AND T_ID in (1,2,3)
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Wow, thanks! This looks exactly like what he's wanting. Quick question: If I have rows that have NULL values in each column that belongs to Table A (but DO have values for columns from table B) does that mean the record is from table B and doesn't have a corresponding entry in table A? Thank you again, and sorry if that's a dumb question! –  Oryx Jan 22 '13 at 16:05
    
Yes, if no matching row is found, the left joined table will have null in all of its columns –  Andomar Jan 22 '13 at 16:06

What you have is equivalent to the simpler

SELECT  
        A.T_ID, 
        A.check_number,
        A.check_type_id,
        A.cashier_id,
        A.terminal_id,
        A.first_tender,
        A.tendered_date_time,
        A.tender_amount,
        A.change_amount,
        A.net_tender_amount,
        A.currency_received,
        B.account_name,
        B.account_number
     FROM 
             tCTD A
         INNER JOIN 
             tGAAAD B
                 ON A.check_number = B.check_number
    WHERE 
             A.T_ID IN (1, 2, 3);

From your description it sounds like you actually want

SELECT  
        A.T_ID, 
        A.check_number,
        A.check_type_id,
        A.cashier_id,
        A.terminal_id,
        A.first_tender,
        A.tendered_date_time,
        A.tender_amount,
        A.change_amount,
        A.net_tender_amount,
        A.currency_received,
        B.account_name,
        B.account_number
     FROM 
             tGAAAD B
         LEFT JOIN 
             tCTD A
                 ON A.check_number = B.check_number
    WHERE 
             ISNULL(A.T_ID, 1) IN (1, 2, 3);

but, if check_number offers a many to many relationship between the tables, as you also imply this may not give you what you want. Do you need to aggregate the product of the relationship in some way?

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