Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I keep using the function below in my classes and would like to write it as generics.

public static IEnumerable<MyObject> Get(string csvFile)
{
    return csvFile
        .ReadAsStream()
        .SplitCrLf()
        .Where(row => !string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(row))
        .Select(row => new MyObject(row.Split(',')));
}

I scratch the code below but didn't work

public static IEnumerable<T> Get<T>(string csvFile)
{
    return csvFile
        .ReadAsStream()
        .SplitCrLf()
        .Where(row => !string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(row))
        .Select(row => new typeof(T)(row.Split(',')));
}

Please advise. Thank you!

share|improve this question
3  
Didn't work, in what way? –  JLRishe Jan 22 '13 at 15:58
1  
Presumably didn't compile, because new typeof(T) is invalid syntax. –  cdhowie Jan 22 '13 at 16:00
    
You can generate a IEnumerable<string> from the csv file. To convert that to an IEnumerable<T> you will need to define a conversion function Func<string,T> and apply it. –  ja72 Jan 22 '13 at 16:03
    
So is each row a MyObject or each element a MyObject? –  ja72 Jan 22 '13 at 16:04

1 Answer 1

up vote 11 down vote accepted

You cannot use new to create instances using generic types in this way1. Consider supplying a factory delegate to the function:

public static IEnumerable<T> Get<T>(string csvFile, Func<string[], T> factory)
{
    return csvFile
        .ReadAsStream()
        .SplitCrLf()
        .Where(row => !string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(row))
        .Select(row => factory(row.Split(',')));
}

Then you would call it like so:

var myObjects = Get("file.csv", row => new MyObject(row));

Alternatively, you can return an IEnumerable<string[]>2 and let the caller decide what to do with it:

public static IEnumerable<string[]> Get(string csvFile)
{
    return csvFile
        .ReadAsStream()
        .SplitCrLf()
        .Where(row => !string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(row))
        .Select(row => row.Split(','));
}

Then the caller could do:

var myObjects = Get("file.csv").Select(row => new MyObject(row));

1You can supply the where T : new() constraint and then you can create new instances using a generic type, but only when it provides a no-argument constructor; you cannot provide arguments when constructing generic types, and your use case appears to require it. A factory delegate is your best option here.

For reference, this is how construction using generic types would look in the no-argument case:

public static T Create<T>() where T : new()
{
    return new T();
}

2Even better would be an IEnumerable<IEnumerable<string>> assuming that your MyObject constructor accepts IEnumerable<string> as well.

share|improve this answer
    
although, there is the Activator.CreateInstance. Nice suggestions though, +1 –  Default Jan 22 '13 at 16:07
2  
@Default Indeed there is. In fact, new T() is compiled as Activator.CreateInstance<T>(). However, one should note that this technique (using CreateInstance to pass arguments to a constructor) will use reflection each time, incurring a potentially serious performance penalty. Using a factory delegate not only gives more flexibility (maybe you want to do more than just construct an object) while also making use of compiled code and avoiding the cost of reflection. –  cdhowie Jan 22 '13 at 16:09
    
great addition! I didn't know that. –  Default Jan 22 '13 at 16:10
    
does default(T) also compile to Activator? –  Default Jan 22 '13 at 16:11
1  
@Default No; the value of default(T) is determined only once for each T, when a constructed generic type is instantiated at runtime. It will be replaced with a constant value at that time. For example, if T is int then the IL representation of default(T) will be ldc.i4.0 (a literal 0 constant) in the constructed type. For all reference types, it will be ldnull (a literal null constant). For structs, it will be new StructType(), which effectively just zeroes a chunk of memory. tl;dr version: there is no reflection overhead with default(T). –  cdhowie Jan 22 '13 at 16:13

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.