Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What I am trying is setting this CSS on element

background: red !important;   

so when I try to do this.

 background: yellow;  

(I am not using external css)it still only shows the red and not the yellow for that one field as I would like it to be.

What I am asking is how to override it, is it possible?

share|improve this question
11  
And that's why we don't use !important kids! You can override !important with !important. –  Christian Varga Jan 22 '13 at 16:07
1  
with another !important, but use after the first one , but usually in 95% of the cases you can avoid using !important –  AlexC Jan 22 '13 at 16:08
4  
!super-duper-really-important; –  j08691 Jan 22 '13 at 16:19
3  
@christian: css 4 will probably have !unimportant, !useless, and !yourbetyoursweepbippy to prioritize the overrides. –  Marc B Jan 22 '13 at 18:15
    
"There has never been a CSS4. There will never be a CSS4. CSS4 is not a thing that exists." - source –  rlemon Jan 29 '13 at 16:30
show 7 more comments

3 Answers 3

up vote 27 down vote accepted
+50

Ans is YES !important can be overridden but you can not override !important by a normal declaration. It has to be higher specificity than all other declarations.

However it can be overridden with a higher specificity !important declaration.

This code snippet in Firefox's parser will explain how it works:

if (HasImportantBit(aPropID)) {
  // When parsing a declaration block, an !important declaration
  // is not overwritten by an ordinary declaration of the same
  // property later in the block.  However, CSSOM manipulations
  // come through here too, and in that case we do want to
  // overwrite the property.
  if (!aOverrideImportant) {
    aFromBlock.ClearLonghandProperty(aPropID);
    return PR_FALSE;
  }
  changed = PR_TRUE;
  ClearImportantBit(aPropID);
}

Good read


Here's an example to show how to override CSS

HTML

<div id="hola" class="hola"></div>

CSS

div { height: 100px; width: 100px; }
div { background-color: green !important; }
.hola{    background-color:red !important; }
#hola{    background-color:pink !important;}

and output will be

enter image description here

Also we can not override inline !important

HTML

<div id="demo" class="demo" style="background-color:yellow !important;"></div>

CSS

div { height: 100px; width: 100px; }
div { background-color: green !important; }
.demo{    background-color:red !important; }
#demo{    background-color:pink !important;}

the output is

enter image description here

jsFiddle

share|improve this answer
    
sorry but its not working ... –  Winter Bash Jan 29 '13 at 15:00
    
please describe .. whats not working ? –  NullPoiиteя Jan 29 '13 at 16:18
2  
Did you try to run that C code in your CSS file? –  rlemon Jan 29 '13 at 16:21
    
@teresko: +1, !important declarations do not alter the specificity, but rather take precedence over "normal" declarations –  o.v. Jan 29 '13 at 21:35
3  
According to the articles linked this is not true. and I quote, "The !important value appended a CSS property value is an automatic win. It overrides even inline styles from the markup. ". - I'm just playing devils advocate - I will test this now. and NullPointer + articles are correct for Chrome + Windows at least. jsfiddle.net/rlemon/J7HyR see here. –  rlemon Jan 29 '13 at 21:36
show 3 more comments

As described in w3 spec, !important declarations do not alter the specificity, but rather take precedence over "normal" declarations. Effectively, such declarations only "compete" between themselves - thus, you can override yours with another !important declaration of higher specificity:

/*
 these below are all higher-specificity selectors and, if both 
 rules are applicable to the same element, background colour
 will be set to "yellow":
 */
.some-class.some-other-class, div.some-class, #some-id {background: yellow !important;}
.some-class {background: red !important;}

There is also the declaration order to consider - a declaration further down in the CSS will take precedence over an earlier one if their selectors have the same specificity.

A case worth noting is when it clashes with an inline declaration. Counterintuitively (but fully in line with the spec), the !important value will come out on top! This means that if you have

<style>
  #secret-container {display:none !important;}
</style>
<script>
  $('#secret-container').show();//using jQuery etc.
</script>
<div id="secret-container">...</div>

the div in question will remain hidden! The only way to have an inline rule take precedence over an !important one is, well, by applying !important to it as well. I'll let you be the judge of how good a practice that is ಠ_ಠ

There's no overriding inline !important though.

share|improve this answer
add comment

!important will override background: yellow; Try to avoid using !important. Take a look at css specificity. http://coding.smashingmagazine.com/2007/07/27/css-specificity-things-you-should-know/

share|improve this answer
    
sorry but its not working . –  Winter Bash Jan 29 '13 at 15:01
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.