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Hi there for my exam revision i had picked up the following sample question for relational algebra:

employee (+person_name, street, city)
works (+person_name, company_name, salary)
company (+company_name, city)
manages (+person_name, manager_name)

+ indicate the underlined primary keys
  1. Find the names of all employees who live in the same city and on the same street as their managers

          MY solution
    JOIN manages and employee (OVER person_name) GIVING T1
    JOIN manages and employee (OVER manager_name) GIVING T2
    PROJECT T1 over person_name, street, city GIVING T3
    PROJECT T2 over street, city GIVING T4
    T3 intersect T4 GIVING T5
    PROJECT T5 over person_name GIVING RESULT
    

This was my solution until I had found out about that the intersection has to be union-compatible (number of columns matching and their headings)

Since then I couldn’t really find a solution to this problem because if I do the following change to line-3
PROJECT T1 over street, city GIVING T3
then I will never have the opportunity to link the result of intersection back to person_name.

On the other hand when I would make the following change to line-4: PROJECT T2 over person_name, street, city GIVING T4
Then upon the intersection I would never get a person who has any other manager than himself.

I would appreciate any hints given, perhaps this online sample i picked up is quite ambiguous.

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1 Answer 1

Another way to phrase the question: for every manager+person pair, find those for which the related city+state are the same for both people. You almost did that:

JOIN manages AND employee (OVER person_name) GIVING T1
JOIN T1 AND employee (OVER manager_name, street, city) GIVING T2
PROJECT T2 OVER person_name, manager_name, street, city GIVING RESULT

The problem statement does not require the names to returned in a single column, and this answer provides a useful result. If need be, you could repeat the above query, taking the union of two projections: one of person_name and the other of manager_name.

Just one thing: many managers would object to one column named "person" and the other "manager" because almost every manager -- your experience notwithstanding, perhaps? -- considers himself a person. More acceptable pairs might be manager/worker, lord/serf, master/slave, etc.

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