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I'm creating a class to help modify images in a GUI. The images can be in either a PictureBox or a DataGridViewImageCell. The class will store as a list all images that can be modified. Each instance of the class will use either PictureBox or DataGridViewImageCells but not both.

Is there a way to handle both inputs? As in, is there some common interface between them, or a way to cast them to some common parent class?

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1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Well, you can always treat them as object, but I would suggest that your class simply provide two overloads for those two types specifically:

class MyClass
{
    public void AddImage(PictureBox image)
    {

    }

    public void AddImage(DataGridViewImageCell image)
    {

    }
}

How you store that internally is up to you. Perhaps you have a List<object> that you cast into/out-of, or perhaps you maintain two separate lists, one for each type, or perhaps you simply add each image to the containing object's children collection.

As for a shared class, I believe from the the MSDN that they do not share a base class other than Object so you'll have to stick with that or wrap them with your own containing class.

EDIT: Here's a more fully fleshed out way handling it with wrapping interfaces and factories.

First, define an interface with a shared based type (in this case object) with which you can pass around the images:

public interface IImageWrapper
{
    object RawImage { get; }
}

public class PictureBoxImageWrapper : IImageWrapper
{
    public object RawImage { get; private set; }

    public PictureBoxMyImage(PictureBox image)
    {
        this.RawImage = image;
    }
}

public class DataGridViewImageCellImageWrapper : IImageWrapper
{
    public object RawImage { get; private set; }

    public DataGridViewImageCellImageWrapper(DataGridViewImageCell image)
    {
        this.RawImage = image;
    }
}

Then a simple factory for the user API to wrap the images with and have compile-time safety as to which image types are strictly supported:

public class ImageWrapperFactory
{
    public IImageWrapper Create(PictureBox image)
    {
        return new PictureBoxImageWrapper(image);
    }

    public IImageWrapper Create(DataGridViewImageCell image)
    {
        return new DataGridViewImageCellImageWrapper(image);
    }
}

Then your displaying class or view can receive these IImageWrapper objects and convert them into usable types:

public class MyDisplayClass
{
    private List<IImageWrapper> Images = new List<IImageWrapper>();

    public void AddImage(IImageWrapper image)
    {
        Images.Add(image);
    }

    private void AddImageToContainer(IImageWrapper image)
    {
        object rawImage = image.RawImage;

        if (rawImage is PictureBox)
            AddImageToContainerImpl((PictureBox)rawImage);
        else if (rawImage is DataGridViewImageCell)
            AddImageToContainerImpl((DataGridViewImageCell)rawImage);
        else
            throw new NotSupportedException();
    }

    private void AddImageToContainerImpl(PictureBox image)
    {
        //add to container
    }

    private void AddImageToContainerImpl(DataGridViewImageCell image)
    {
        //add to container
    }
}

Some sample usage:

PictureBox myImage = ...
MyDisplayClass myView = ...

myView.AddImage(ImageWrapperFactory.Create(myImage));

As this is, the underlying type of the image isn't too strongly enforced. If you wish, you can update the factory to return strongly typed IImageWrapper objects as PictureBoxImageWrapper and in turn have the display class strongly typed against those that it supports, but that kinda defeats the purpose (you may as well strongly type against PictureBox/DataGridViewImageCell as in my first answer.

EDIT: Yet another way is to leverage implicit operators for your "factory". This way your API just "passes" in the raw image objects and if they're supported, an implicit operator will be found. If they're not, then you'll get a compile time exception:

public sealed class ImageWrapper
{
    public object RawData { get; private set; }

    private ImageWrapper(object rawData)
    {
        this.RawData = rawData;
    }

    public static implicit operator ImageWrapper(PictureBox image)
    {
        return new ImageWrapper(image);
    }

    public static implicit operator ImageWrapper(DataGridViewImageCell image)
    {
        return new ImageWrapper(image);
    }
}


PictureBox myImage = ...
ImageControl unsupportedImage = ... 
MyDisplayClass myView = ...

myView.AddImage(myImage); //OK!
myView.AddImage(unsupportedImage);// compile error!
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Wow, thanks for your help. I'll have to try out the second solution, but casting them from objects seems to work fairly well so far. –  H H Jan 22 '13 at 16:44
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