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Is there a way to generate a 'nice' Coding conventions / guidelines document from existing CheckStyle configuration file?

This document must contain the description of the rules enforced, and the configuration values (like the max line length, violation severity, etc).

The benefit of having such a document is to ramp up a new team member faster, without reading CheckStyle configuration file.

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In the meantime started to follow the always available DIY method, created a gitHub repo with a sample xsl transformation setup. link –  Marcell Jan 23 '13 at 15:34
    
This is just wrong. Imagine how your developers will feel when they discover that their coding guidelines were generated from a Checkstyle configuration! When the guidelines should have been a carefully crafted document talking about much more than just style. –  Thomas Jan 26 at 21:24
    
I agree with you, the purpose is not to generate an ultimate code style handbook, just an extension explaining the ruleset. If you have some checksyle config, you may have some custom settings. How would you present those customizations to a new team member? –  Marcell Feb 7 at 19:52
    
How would you present those customizations to a new team member? In the case of Checkstyle, I would recommend setting the message text to something that clearly explains what the problem is (i.e. explain the naming convention instead of giving the regex that didn't match). Nobody wants to open an external document in order to be able to fix a Checkstyle warning correctly (although the verbose version of the naming convention should be in there). –  Thomas Feb 7 at 20:26
    
That is a good idea. I'll accept this as an answer, if you extend it with some samples make it a bit more detailed. Altough after a year I don't feel huge need for a tool like this. :) (never had the intention to force anyone to use it during a normal developer day, but it can be nice to be in the deriverables) –  Marcell Feb 21 at 17:42

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would generally advise against generating even parts of a coding guidelines document, because that would cause acceptance problems with your software engineers. Also, the Checkstyle rules should, in my humble opinion, not be part of the coding guidelines document itself. Instead, the coding guidelines should state something like "Take care not to cause Checkstyle issues."

The Checkstyle tool can be configured with information to show to the developer with the warning. That way, developers won't need to open an external document in order to resolve Checkstyle warnings correctly, because all required information is already there.

Example: The LocalVariableName check checks the naming convention for non-final local variables. Its default message text is:

Member Names: Name 'Foo' must match pattern '^[a-z][a-zA-Z0-9]{0,31}$'.

If you configure the check like this:

<module name="LocalVariableName">
  <message key="name.invalidPattern"
    value="Local variable name ''{0}'' must not be longer than 32 alphanumeric
           characters and start with a lowercase letter. Regex: ''{1}''"/>
</module>

Then the output would be:

Local variable name 'Foo' must not be longer than 32 alphanumeric characters and
start with a lowercase letter. Regex: '^[a-z][a-zA-Z0-9]{0,31}$'

Admittedly, if all your developers knew their regular expressions well enough, the new message text will not be necessary. But not everybody is a regex expert, and this is just an example which can be applied to many checks, including checks without regexes.

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A few typical coding standards are given here:

Comments:
    Write Javadoc comments for all classes, methods, and variables.
Naming conventions:
    Class names should be nouns, in mixed case with the first letter of each internal word capitalized (MyClass).
    Variable names should be nouns, in mixed case with a lowercase first letter, and with the first letter of each internal word in upper case (myVariable).
    Constants should be in all uppercase with words separated by underscore (MY_CONSTANT_VALUE).
Indentation:
    Spaces should be preferred to tabs for indenting purposes.
Declarations:
    One declaration per line, with comments, for example:


    int class; // The child's class, from 1 to 8
    int age;   // The child's age

    rather than:


    int class, age;

Statements:
    Opening braces in compound statements should be at the end of the line that begins the compound statement; the closing brace should begin a line and be indented to the beginning of the compound statement, for example:


    while (i < 10) {
    i++;
    }

Best practices:
    Use the final keyword for variables and parameters that will not need to be modified.
    Don't declare variables within loops
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