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I am working on a messaging system that is a bit more advanced than simply sending receiving messages; it is something that looks like facebook chat/messaging: it has chat aspects but also messaging ones, like group messages, read/unread messages, and other.

On redis, I would simply use lists to store received messages, for example like this:

myID = [ "amy|how are you?", "frank|long time no see!" ]
amyID = [ "john|I'm good! you?" ]

(I have simplified it all a lot for easier reading.

But in this way I would not be able to keep track of single conversations, as they will all be always flushed once the messages are received (so basically no "inbox" feature.

On the other hand, if I use mongodb, I could use something like this: How to keep track of a private messaging system using MongoDB?

I though of the following benefits/disadvantages:

MONGODB

advantages:

  • can see inbox view
  • can check read/unread messages on each conversation

disadvantages

  • not as fast as redis
  • storage size increases a lot

REDIS

advantages:

  • easy to pick up new messages
  • no storage problems (messages are flushed)

disadvantages:

  • once messages are sent to the client are lost, so no read/unread features and
  • no inbox

Any ideas?

Thanks in advance.

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3 Answers

I cannot answer for Redis because I don't use it and never have so I won't pretend I have.

However, if for some reason, you are not using something like an XMPP client like Facebook does: http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/xml/tutorials/x-realtimeXMPPtut/section3.html (aka Jabber) for chat then I will describe about a pure MongoDB solution in this situation.

MongoDB uses the OS' LRU as a means to cache documents and queries, fair enough it provides no direct query cache however if you are smart you will not need one; instead you just read all your queries directly from RAM. With this in mind MongoDB can be just as fast as Redis, since Redis uses the computers RAM too.

Speed between the two on a optimised query is negligible I would think. The true measure of speed comes from your schema, indexes, cluster setup and the queries you perform.

A note about storage size here, taking your comment into consideration:

the problem with flushing mongodb is bigger than I initially though: apparently when you delete something on mongo you only delete its reference, so if you delete 4mb of documents, it won't free up that much space. the only way to actually free up that memory is to run a dbRepair (or something among this line) that basically blocks the db while running....

You seem to have some misconceptions about exactly how MongoDB works.

This link will be of help to you: http://www.10gen.com/presentations/storage-engine-internals it will describe some of the reasons why excessive disk space is used and will also explain some of the misconceptions you have about how a computer works and how MongoDB frees space and reuses it.

MongoDB does not free space on a record level. Instead it will send that "empty" record (record and document are two different things as the presentation will tell you), shove it into a deleted bucket list and then reuse that space when a new document (or a updated document that has been moved) comes along and fits in that space.

It is true that if you are not careful and understanding on how MongoDB works on this level that you will probably be forced to run repairDB fairly regularly to keep any sort of performance after fragmentation.

As for memory handling. The OS handles this as I said. A good explanation of when the OS will free memory is on Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paging

Until there is not enough RAM to store all the data needed, the process of obtaining an empty page frame does not involve removing another page from RAM.

So the OS will handle removing pages for you and you shouldn't concern yourself with that part, instead you should be concerned with making your working set fit into RAM.

If you are worried about storing messages and don't really want to, i.e. you want them to be "flushed" you can actually use the TTL feature that comes with the later MongoDB installations: http://docs.mongodb.org/manual/tutorial/expire-data/ which will basically allow you to set a time-out for when a message should be deleted from the collection.

So personally if set-up right MongoDB could do messaging and chat like Facebook do it, of course they use the XMPP protocol and then archive messages into Cassandra for search but you don't have to do it like they do, that is just one way to achieve the same goal.

Hope this makes sense and I haven't gone round in circles, it is a bit of a long answer.

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I think the big point here is the storage problems. You would need a lot of machine or a good system of flushing some conversations for you to use MongoDB. Despite wanting a sort of "inbox" system... I think redis would be more conducive to a well-working chat system - you just need to come up with some very creative workaround... or give up that design goal.

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the problem with flushing mongodb is bigger than I initially though: apparently when you delete something on mongo you only delete its reference, so if you delete 4mb of documents, it won't free up that much space. the only way to actually free up that memory is to run a dbRepair (or something among this line) that basically blocks the db while running.... –  john smith Jan 22 '13 at 16:21
    
on the other hand, I cannot keep track of already read messages on redis because as it runs on memory, it is not supposed to grow indefinitely but have a foreseeable size –  john smith Jan 22 '13 at 16:22
    
@johnsmith Right - you'll have to make the design decision about what is more important, or tailor a solution that satisfies both requirements for your unique system. –  PinkElephantsOnParade Jan 22 '13 at 16:23
    
@johnsmith The OS decides when you "free up memory" based on the LRU, which is normally a lot better than trying to get the application to manage that. As for deleting, the disk space will go into a "free space" type area which will be reused by other records which fit that patch later on –  Sammaye Jan 22 '13 at 16:25
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We use a mixed design, so we when we need snappy performance as in messages, queues and caches it´s on Redis and when we need to search on secondary indexes or update whole documents, we use MongoDB.

You can also try Riak, which can grow more linearly and smoothly than MongoDB.

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