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So I have the code for a deck, but I dont know how to make another class to deal 4 hands of 10 cards each. The other class should print on the screen, in text, 4 hands of 10 random cards. Can someone show me the code on how to accomplish this? Im using blueJ aswell.

Below is my code for the deck:

public class Card 
{
public static void main(String[] args) 
{
    String[] suit = { "Clubs", "Diamonds", "Hearts", "Spades" };
    String[] rank =     { "2", "3", "4", "5", "6", "7", "8", "9", "10", "Jack", "Queen", "King", "Ace" };

    int SUITS = suit.length;
    int RANKS = rank.length;
    int N = SUITS * RANKS;

    // initialize deck
    String[] deck = new String[N];
    for (int i = 0; i < RANKS; i++) {
        for (int j = 0; j < SUITS; j++) {
            deck[SUITS*i + j] = rank[i] + " of " + suit[j];
        }
    }

    // shuffle the deck
    for (int i = 0; i < N; i++) {
        int r = i + (int) (Math.random() * (N-i));
        String t = deck[r];
        deck[r] = deck[i];
        deck[i] = t;
    }

    for (int i = 0; i < N; i++) {
        System.out.println(deck[i]);
    }
   }

}
share|improve this question
1  
Just like you would if you were dealing real cards. Start with the top card and give it to player1 (usually left of the dealer). The next card from the top goes to player2 (across), the next to player3 (right), next to the dealer. Repeat until each player has 10 cards. –  Ken White Jan 22 '13 at 16:29
    
Im a complete noob at java, I have no idea how to do that. Which is why I asked for the code so I could study it. –  Sunny Jan 22 '13 at 16:32
2  
So make an effort to do so, based on the explanation I gave you, and ask specific questions about problems you run into then. You need to at least put some effort into solving it yourself first, though. This really isn't a "please write my code" site. –  Ken White Jan 22 '13 at 16:34
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2 Answers

In the spirit of the game, let's create a hierarchy for handling could work. The largest scope will be the Game, which will delegate the actions to the other classes. We will also have 3 classes: Deck, Dealer, Player.

A Game will have a Dealer, and an ArrayList of Player A Dealer will have a Deck A Player will have an ArrayList of String indicating your cards

A Game can then tell a dealer to create and shuffle a deck. You can call a dealCards passing the Players as a param to the dealer who can, based on the number of players, give them the next element in the Deck, and remove that element from the deck.

Once you have dealt all the cards, the game can then tell the players to show their hands, printing the results.

public Dealer{
    private Deck deck;

    ....

    public void shuffleDeck(){...}
    public void dealCards(List<Player> players){ ...}
}

public Player{
    private List<String> hand;

    ....

    public void addToHand(String card){....}
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for trying to help. But I have no idea how to use this in correlation with my class :S –  Sunny Jan 22 '13 at 16:43
    
Sorry, I thought you were looking for a way to use other classes (to get out of running everything from the main method). I may have misinterpreted your question. –  Zylth Jan 22 '13 at 16:47
    
No worries, basically my question is, how do I deal 4 hands of 10 cards, and print them on the screen using the class I already have. –  Sunny Jan 22 '13 at 16:54
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Your Card / Deck class should be broken up into two classes.

A Card class would describe a card.

public class Card {

    private String rank;
    private String suit;

    public Card(String rank, String suit) {
        this.rank = rank;
        this.suit = suit;
    }

    public String getRank() {
        return rank;
    }

    public String getSuit() {
        return suit;
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        return rank + " of " + suit;
    }

}

A Deck class describes a deck of cards.

public class Deck {

    private String[]    rank    = { "2", "3", "4", "5", "6", "7", "8", "9",
            "10", "Jack", "Queen", "King", "Ace" };
    private String[]    suit    = { "Clubs", "Diamonds", "Hearts", "Spades" };

    private Card[]      cards;

    public Deck() {
        cards = new Card[suit.length * rank.length];
        for (int i = 0; i < rank.length; i++) {
            for (int j = 0; j < suit.length; j++) {
                cards[suit.length * i + j] = new Card(rank[i], suit[j]);
            }
        }
    }

    public Card[] shuffleDeck() {
        for (int i = 0; i < cards.length; i++) {
            int r = (int) (Math.random() * (cards.length - 1));
            Card t = cards[r];
            cards[r] = cards[i];
            cards[i] = t;
        }
        return cards;
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();
        for (int i = 0; i < cards.length; i++) {
            builder.append(cards[i].toString());
            builder.append(System.getProperty("line.separator"));
        }
        return builder.toString();
    }
}

Until you understand how these two classes work together, there's no point introducing other classes.

The point of Java, or any object oriented computer language, is to break up your problem into smaller classes that each do one thing and do it well.

share|improve this answer
    
The reason I have it like how I have it is because I'm doing a excercise which tells me to make a class called card which creates and shuffles a deck. –  Sunny Jan 22 '13 at 16:57
    
The reason you're confused is you're trying to write one class that does everything. The point of Java, or any object oriented computer language, is to break up your problem into smaller classes that each do one thing and do it well. –  Gilbert Le Blanc Jan 22 '13 at 17:04
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