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I have a view like so:

<div ng-controller= "test" ng-init = "doit()">
    <span>{{testval}}</span>
</div>

The view's controller looks like this:

function test($scope){
    var counter = 0;
    $scope.doit = function(){
       console.log('switched to view');
       $scope.testval = counter++; 
    };
};

The first time I switch to the view controlled by 'test', it shows '0'. After that, it shows nothing, but the console.log continues firing. How can I set this up to execute 'doit' each time I switch to the view and successfully update the view by modifying $scope?

Thanks

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2 Answers 2

Remove the ng-init() and put the call to doit() into your controller:

function test($scope){
    var counter = 0;
    $scope.doit = function(){
       console.log('switched to view');
       $scope.testval = counter++; 
    };
    $scope.doit();
};

Each time you switch to this view, the controller code will execute. If you want the counter to persist between view changes, you'll have to put it into a service or $rootScope (because the controller, well its $scope, is destroyed when you move to another view).

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I thought the controller was instantiated as an object? I want to be able to call "doit" dynamically and on-the-fly from within the view. –  Andrew Rhyne Jan 22 '13 at 17:26
    
@Andrew, when ng-controller is encountered in the HTML (or when ng-view is used and a route specifies which controller to create for that route, and you switch to that route) Angular creates a new scope and then "applies (in the sense of JavaScript's Function#apply) the controller constructor function" to the new scope object. So is there also a controller object? It is not clear to me if there is or not. –  Mark Rajcok Jan 22 '13 at 20:49
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Had to add $scope.digest() to the end of doit. The example listed is a boiled down example of the logic I was encountering on a much smaller scale. In reality, it was a function called getPhysOrd that executed an asynchronous templated websocket bridge to query data off the server. It had to be able to do this on-the-fly. Calling digest forced the watchers to update the view according to the model changes. Thanks

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That being said, @Mark Rajcok's solution worked much better –  Andrew Rhyne Jan 22 '13 at 17:30

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