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I have a structure which I need to populate and write to disk (several actually).

An example is:

byte-6    
bit0 - original_or_copy  
bit1 - copyright  
bit2 - data_alignment_indicator  
bit3 - PES_priority  
bit4-bit5 - PES_scrambling control.  
bit6-bit7 - reserved

In C I might do something like the following:

struct PESHeader  {
    unsigned reserved:2;
    unsigned scrambling_control:2;
    unsigned priority:1;
    unsigned data_alignment_indicator:1;
    unsigned copyright:1;
    unsigned original_or_copy:1;
};

Is there any way to do this in C# that would enable me to access the bits using the struct dereferencing dot operator?

For a couple of structures, I can just do bit shifting wrapped in an accessor function.

I have loads of structures to handle in this way, so I'm looking for something that's easier to read and quicker to write.

Thanks, Rob

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9 Answers 9

up vote 35 down vote accepted

I'd probably knock together something using attributes, then a conversion class to convert suitably attributed structures to the bitfield primitives. Something like...

using System;

namespace BitfieldTest
{
  [global::System.AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Field, AllowMultiple = false)]
  sealed class BitfieldLengthAttribute : Attribute
  {
    uint length;

    public BitfieldLengthAttribute(uint length)
    {
        this.length = length;
    }

    public uint Length { get { return length; } }
  }

  static class PrimitiveConversion
  {
    public static long ToLong<T>(T t) where T : struct
    {
        long r = 0;
        int offset = 0;

        // For every field suitably attributed with a BitfieldLength
        foreach (System.Reflection.FieldInfo f in t.GetType().GetFields())
        {
            object[] attrs = f.GetCustomAttributes(typeof(BitfieldLengthAttribute), false);
            if (attrs.Length == 1)
            {
                uint fieldLength  = ((BitfieldLengthAttribute)attrs[0]).Length;

                // Calculate a bitmask of the desired length
                long mask = 0;
                for (int i = 0; i < fieldLength; i++)
                    mask |= 1 << i;

                r |= ((UInt32)f.GetValue(t) & mask) << offset;

                offset += (int)fieldLength;
            }
        }

        return r;
    }
  }

  struct PESHeader
  {
    [BitfieldLength(2)]
    public uint reserved;
    [BitfieldLength(2)]
    public uint scrambling_control;
    [BitfieldLength(1)]
    public uint priority;
    [BitfieldLength(1)]
    public uint data_alignment_indicator;
    [BitfieldLength(1)]
    public uint copyright;
    [BitfieldLength(1)]
    public uint original_or_copy;
  };

  public class MainClass
  {
    public static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        PESHeader p = new PESHeader();

        p.reserved = 3;
        p.scrambling_control = 2;
        p.data_alignment_indicator = 1;

        long l = PrimitiveConversion.ToLong(p);


        for (int i = 63; i >= 0; i--)
        {
           Console.Write( ((l & (1l << i)) > 0) ? "1" : "0");
        }

        Console.WriteLine();

        return;
    }
  }
}

Which produces the expected ...000101011. Of course, it needs more error checking and a slightly saner typing, but the concept is (I think) sound, reusable, and lets you knock out easily maintained structures by the dozen.

adamw

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That is an awesome, really creative solution. Well done! –  dviljoen Oct 13 '10 at 15:09
3  
NOTE: Per MSDN, "The GetFields method does not return fields in a particular order, such as alphabetical or declaration order. Your code must not depend on the order in which fields are returned, because that order varies." Doesn't this cause a problem here? –  Kevin P. Rice Apr 1 '12 at 4:23
1  
If you create a IBitfield 'marker' interface (having no members) you can convert the PrimitiveConversion class to extension methods for any structure that implements IBitfield. For example: public static long ToLong(this IBitfield obj) {}. Then, the ToLong() method will appear in Intellisense for IBitfield objects. –  Kevin P. Rice Apr 1 '12 at 22:28

By using an enum you can do this, but will look awkward.

[Flags]
public enum PESHeaderFlags
{
    IsCopy = 1, // implied that if not present, then it is an original
    IsCopyrighted = 2,
    IsDataAligned = 4,
    Priority = 8,
    ScramblingControlType1 = 0,
    ScramblingControlType2 = 16,
    ScramblingControlType3 = 32,
    ScramblingControlType4 = 16+32,
    ScramblingControlFlags = ScramblingControlType1 | ScramblingControlType2 | ... ype4
    etc.
}
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You want StructLayoutAttribute

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Explicit, Size=1, CharSet=CharSet.Ansi)]
public struct Foo 
{ [FieldOffset(0)]public byte original_or_copy; 
  [FieldOffset(0)]public byte copyright;
  [FieldOffset(0)]public byte data_alignment_indicator; 
  [FieldOffset(0)]public byte PES_priority; 
  [FieldOffset(0)]public byte PES_scrambling_control; 
  [FieldOffset(0)]public byte reserved; 
}

This is really a union but you can use it as a bitfield--you just have to be conscious of where in the byte the bits for each field are supposed to be. Utility functions and/or constants to AND against can help.

const byte _original_or_copy = 1;
const byte _copyright        = 2;

//bool ooo = foo.original_or_copy();
static bool original_or_copy(this Foo foo) 
{ return  (foo.original_or_copy & _original_or_copy)  == original_or_copy;
}

There is also LayoutKind.Sequential which will allow you to do it the C way.

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As Christophe Lambrechts suggested BitVector32 provides a solution. Jitted performance should be adequate, but don't know for sure. Here's the code illustrating this solution:

public struct rcSpan
{
    //C# Spec 10.4.5.1: The static field variable initializers of a class correspond to a sequence of assignments that are executed in the textual order in which they appear in the class declaration.
    internal static readonly BitVector32.Section sminSection = BitVector32.CreateSection(0x1FFF);
    internal static readonly BitVector32.Section smaxSection = BitVector32.CreateSection(0x1FFF, sminSection);
    internal static readonly BitVector32.Section areaSection = BitVector32.CreateSection(0x3F, smaxSection);

    internal BitVector32 data;

    //public uint smin : 13; 
    public uint smin
    {
        get { return (uint)data[sminSection]; }
        set { data[sminSection] = (int)value; }
    }

    //public uint smax : 13; 
    public uint smax
    {
        get { return (uint)data[smaxSection]; }
        set { data[smaxSection] = (int)value; }
    }

    //public uint area : 6; 
    public uint area
    {
        get { return (uint)data[areaSection]; }
        set { data[areaSection] = (int)value; }
    }
}

You can do a lot this way. You can do even better without using BitVector32, by providing handmade accessors for every field:

public struct rcSpan2
{
    internal uint data;

    //public uint smin : 13; 
    public uint smin
    {
        get { return data & 0x1FFF; }
        set { data = (data & ~0x1FFFu ) | (value & 0x1FFF); }
    }

    //public uint smax : 13; 
    public uint smax
    {
        get { return (data >> 13) & 0x1FFF; }
        set { data = (data & ~(0x1FFFu << 13)) | (value & 0x1FFF) << 13; }
    }

    //public uint area : 6; 
    public uint area
    {
        get { return (data >> 26) & 0x3F; }
        set { data = (data & ~(0x3F << 26)) | (value & 0x3F) << 26; }
    }
}

Surprisingly this last, handmade solution seems to be the most convenient, least convoluted, and the shortest one. That's of course only my personal preference.

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You could also use the BitVector32 and especially the Section struct. The example is very good.

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A flags enum can work too, I think, if you make it a byte enum:

[Flags] enum PesHeaders : byte { /* ... */ }
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Could an Enum with the Flags Attribute help maybe? See here:

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/8447/enum-flags-attribute#8460

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While it is a class, using BitArray seems like the way to least reinvent the wheel. Unless you're really pressed for performance, this is the simplest option. (Indexes can be referenced with the [] operator.)

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I don't think the Flags attribute allows me to create a field that's longer than a single bit - see "scrambling_control" in example.

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