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In a WPF application, I have a class that receives messages over the network. Whenever an object of said class has received a full message, an event is raised. In the MainWindow of the application I have an event handler subscribed to that event. The event handler is guaranteed to be called on the GUI thread of the application.

Whenever the event handler is called, the contents of the message needs to be applied to the model. Doing so can be quite costly (>200ms on current hardware). That's why applying the message is offloaded onto the thread pool with Task.Run.

Now, messages can be received in very close succession, so the event handler can be called while a previous change is still being processed. What is the simplest way to ensure that messages are only applied one at time? So far, I've come up with the following:

using System;
using System.Threading.Tasks;
using System.Windows;

public partial class MainWindow : Window
{
    private Model model = new Model();
    private Task pending = Task.FromResult<bool>(false);

    // Assume e carries a message received over the network.
    private void OnMessageReceived(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        this.pending = ApplyToModel(e);
    }

    private async Task ApplyToModel(EventArgs e)
    {
        await this.pending;
        await Task.Run(() => this.model.Apply(e)); // Assume this is an expensive call.
    }
}

This seems to work as expected, however it also appears this will inevitably produce a "memory leak", because the task to apply a message will always first wait on the task that applied the previous message. If so, then the following change should avoid the leak:

private async Task ApplyToModel(EventArgs e)
{
    if (!this.pending.IsCompleted)
    {
        await this.pending;
    }

    await Task.Run(() => this.model.Apply(e));
}

Is this a sensible way to avoid reentrancy with async void event handlers?

EDIT: Removed the unnecessary await this.pending; statement in OnMessageReceived.

EDIT 2: The messages must be applied to the model in the same order in which they have been received.

share|improve this question
    
@Servy: You mean in OnMessageReceived? Good question, I guess it is not necessary. –  Andreas Huber Jan 22 '13 at 17:29
    
@Servy: I agree it's not necessary in OnMessageReceived, but it is in ApplyToModel, right? –  Andreas Huber Jan 22 '13 at 17:37
    
I see what you're doing with it now. –  Servy Jan 22 '13 at 17:42

2 Answers 2

We need to thank Stephen Toub here, as he has some very useful async locking constructs demonstrated in a blog series, including an async lock block.

Here is the code from that article (including some code from the previous article in the series):

public class AsyncLock
{
    private readonly AsyncSemaphore m_semaphore;
    private readonly Task<Releaser> m_releaser;

    public AsyncLock()
    {
        m_semaphore = new AsyncSemaphore(1);
        m_releaser = Task.FromResult(new Releaser(this));
    }

    public Task<Releaser> LockAsync()
    {
        var wait = m_semaphore.WaitAsync();
        return wait.IsCompleted ?
            m_releaser :
            wait.ContinueWith((_, state) => new Releaser((AsyncLock)state),
                this, CancellationToken.None,
                TaskContinuationOptions.ExecuteSynchronously, TaskScheduler.Default);
    }

    public struct Releaser : IDisposable
    {
        private readonly AsyncLock m_toRelease;

        internal Releaser(AsyncLock toRelease) { m_toRelease = toRelease; }

        public void Dispose()
        {
            if (m_toRelease != null)
                m_toRelease.m_semaphore.Release();
        }
    }
}

public class AsyncSemaphore
{
    private readonly static Task s_completed = Task.FromResult(true);
    private readonly Queue<TaskCompletionSource<bool>> m_waiters = new Queue<TaskCompletionSource<bool>>();
    private int m_currentCount;

    public AsyncSemaphore(int initialCount)
    {
        if (initialCount < 0) throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("initialCount");
        m_currentCount = initialCount;
    }
    public Task WaitAsync()
    {
        lock (m_waiters)
        {
            if (m_currentCount > 0)
            {
                --m_currentCount;
                return s_completed;
            }
            else
            {
                var waiter = new TaskCompletionSource<bool>();
                m_waiters.Enqueue(waiter);
                return waiter.Task;
            }
        }
    }
    public void Release()
    {
        TaskCompletionSource<bool> toRelease = null;
        lock (m_waiters)
        {
            if (m_waiters.Count > 0)
                toRelease = m_waiters.Dequeue();
            else
                ++m_currentCount;
        }
        if (toRelease != null)
            toRelease.SetResult(true);
    }
}

Now applying it to your case:

private readonly AsyncLock m_lock = new AsyncLock();

private async void OnMessageReceived(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    using(var releaser = await m_lock.LockAsync()) 
    {
        await Task.Run(() => this.model.Apply(e));
    }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Other options include the SemaphoreSlim type in .NET 4.5 and the AsyncLock type in my AsyncEx library. –  Stephen Cleary Jan 22 '13 at 19:29
    
@StephenCleary Won't the Semaphore solution do a blocking wait, not an async wait? –  Servy Jan 22 '13 at 19:43
    
@Servy Not if you use its WaitAsync() method. –  svick Jan 22 '13 at 20:43
2  
@StephenCleary BTW, your link to SemaphoreSlim is wrong. It links to the .Net 4.0 version, which doesn't have WaitAsync(). Here is the link to the .Net 4.5 version. –  svick Jan 22 '13 at 20:44
    
My bad! Thanks, @svick! –  Stephen Cleary Jan 22 '13 at 23:50

Given an eventhandler which uses async await we cannot use a lock outside the Task because the calling thread is the same for every event call so the lock will always let it pass.

var object m_LockObject = new Object();

private async void OnMessageReceived(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    // Does not work
    Monitor.Enter(m_LockObject);

    await Task.Run(() => this.model.Apply(e));

    Monitor.Exit(m_LockObject);
}

But we can lock inside the Task because Task.Run always generates a new Task which is not run in parallel on the same thread

var object m_LockObject = new Object();

private async void OnMessageReceived(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    await Task.Run(() => 
    {
        // Does work
        lock(m_LockObject)
        {
            this.model.Apply(e);
        }
    });
}

So when an event calls OnMessageReceived it returns immidiatly and model.Apply is only entered one after another.

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