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I frequently convert 16-bit grayscale image data to 8-bit image data for display. It's almost always useful to adjust the minimum and maximum display intensity to highlight the 'interesting' parts of the image.

The code below does roughly what I want, but it's ugly and inefficient, and makes many intermediate copies of the image data. How can I achieve the same result with a minimum memory footprint and processing time?

import numpy

image_data = numpy.random.randint( #Realistic images would be much larger
    low=100, high=14000, size=(1, 5, 5)).astype(numpy.uint16)

display_min = 1000
display_max = 10000.0

print image_data
threshold_image = ((image_data.astype(float) - display_min) *
                   (image_data > display_min))
print threshold_image
scaled_image = (threshold_image * (255. / (display_max - display_min)))
scaled_image[scaled_image > 255] = 255
print scaled_image
display_this_image = scaled_image.astype(numpy.uint8)
print display_this_image
share|improve this question
up vote 8 down vote accepted

What you are doing is halftoning your image.

The methods proposed by others work great, but they are repeating a lot of expensive computations over and over again. Since in a uint16 there are at most 65,536 different values, using a look-up table (LUT) can streamline things a lot. And since the LUT is small, you don't have to worry that much about doing things in place, or not creating boolean arrays. The following code reeuses Bi Rico's function to create the LUT:

import numpy as np
import timeit

rows, cols = 768, 1024
image = numpy.random.randint(100, 14000,
                             size=(1, rows, cols)).astype(numpy.uint16)
display_min = 1000
display_max = 10000

def display(image, display_min, display_max): # copied from Bi Rico
    # Here I set copy=True in order to ensure the original image is not
    # modified. If you don't mind modifying the original image, you can
    # set copy=False or skip this step.
    image = np.array(image, copy=True)
    image.clip(display_min, display_max, out=image)
    image -= display_min
    image //= (display_max - display_min + 1) / 256.
    return image.astype(np.uint8)

def lut_display(image, display_min, display_max) :
    lut = np.arange(2**16, dtype='uint16')
    lut = display(lut, display_min, display_max)
    return np.take(lut, image)

>>> print np.all(display(image, display_min,
                         display_max) == lut_display(image, display_min,
                                                     display_max))
True
>>> timeit.timeit('display(image, display_min, display_max)',
                  'from __main__ import display, image, display_min, display_max',
                   number=10)
0.304813282062
>>> timeit.timeit('lut_display(image, display_min, display_max)',
                  'from __main__ import lut_display, image, display_min, display_max',
                  number=10)
0.0591987428298

So there is a x5 speed-up, which is not a bad thing, I guess...

share|improve this answer
1  
Very nice! This is the sort of thing I wouldn't have come up with on my own. – Andrew Jan 22 '13 at 20:18
    
Beautiful and elegant solution! – RockJake28 Oct 29 '15 at 15:47

I would avoid casting the image to float, you could do something like:

import numpy as np

def display(image, display_min, display_max):
    # Here I set copy=True in order to ensure the original image is not
    # modified. If you don't mind modifying the original image, you can
    # set copy=False or skip this step.
    image = np.array(image, copy=True)

    image.clip(display_min, display_max, out=image)
    image -= display_min
    image //= (display_min - display_max + 1) / 256.
    image = image.astype(np.uint8)
    # Display image

Here an optional copy of the image is made in it's native data type and an 8 bit copy is make on the last line.

share|improve this answer

To reduce memory usage, do the clipping in-place and avoid creating the boolean arrays.

>>> dataf = image_data.astype(float)
>>> numpy.clip(dataf, display_min, display_max, out=dataf)
>>> dataf -= display_min
>>> datab = ((255. / (display_max - display_min)) * dataf).astype(numpy.uint8)

If you keep your clipping limits as integer values, you can alternately do this:

>>> numpy.clip(image_data, display_min, display_max, out=image_data)
>>> image_data-= display_min
>>> datab = numpy.empty_like(image_data)
>>> numpy.multiply(255. / (display_max - display_min), image_data, out=datab)

Note that a temporary float array will still be created in the last line before the uint8 array is created.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice! I didn't know about clip. – Andrew Jan 22 '13 at 18:30
    
I wonder if using numpy.multiply with the out argument set to image_data works equivalently? I know it's trying to write float data to a uint16 array, but that might be what we want anyway? – Andrew Jan 22 '13 at 18:36
    
The idea being, to eliminate the float array. – Andrew Jan 22 '13 at 19:14
    
That's a great point. I edited the second version in my answer to use the out= keyword. – bogatron Jan 22 '13 at 19:40

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