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I am making a Magento extension that calls a custom JS file on the product view page. This custom JS file will load last and needs to override the formatPrice() function found at the bottom of /js/varien/product.js.

The original formatPrice function is as follows:

formatPrice: function(price) {
return formatCurrency(price, this.priceFormat);
}

I would like to replace / override this function with the following:

formatPrice: function(price) {
if (price % 1 == 0) { this.priceFormat.requiredPrecision = 0; }

return formatCurrency(price, this.priceFormat);
}

How do I write the JS code in my custom JS file so that it will properly override this function? I'm not familiar with JS enough to know.

share|improve this question
2  
What object is formatPrice a property of? Is it global? – bfavaretto Jan 22 '13 at 17:29
    
Like bfavaretto said: It depends on where formatPrice is defined. – Alp Jan 22 '13 at 17:30
    
I believe it sits inside Product.OptionsPrice.prototype. An object is created with this prototype using the line Product.OptionsPrice = Class.create(); immediately preceding the declaration of Product.OptionsPrice.prototype. – iakkam Jan 22 '13 at 18:16
up vote 2 down vote accepted

If it is global then you can just do window.formatPrice = myNewFormatPrice; if it is a member of an object then you would do something like: anObject.formatPrice = myNewFormatPrice;

If you need to edit the prototype of an object use: Product.OptionsPrice.prototype.formatPrice = myFormatPrice;

Also you need to look into the access to requiredPrecision. If it is "private" or "protected" then you won't be able to access it.

share|improve this answer
    
OK, I got it: function myFormatPrice(price) { if (price % 1 == 0) { this.priceFormat.requiredPrecision = 0; } return formatCurrency(price, this.priceFormat); } Product.OptionsPrice.prototype.formatPrice = myFormatPrice; Thanks for your help. – iakkam Jan 22 '13 at 20:40

While @jholloman's answer is correct from a functional standpoint, you might consider doing this the Prototype's way, inheriting from Product.OptionsPrice and using that new class instead. This is from app\design\frontend\base\default\template\catalog\product\view.phtml, line 36 (where I presume you need it changed):

Original

<script type="text/javascript">
    var optionsPrice = new Product.OptionsPrice(<?php echo $this->getJsonConfig() ?>);
</script>

Modified

<script type="text/javascript">
    var MyOptionPrice = Class.create(Product.OptionsPrice, { // inherit from Product.OptionsPrice
        formatPrice: function($super, price) { // $super references the original method (see link below)
            if (price % 1 === 0) { 
                this.priceFormat.requiredPrecision = 0; 
            }
            return $super(price);
        }        
    });
    var optionsPrice = new MyOptionPrice(<?php echo $this->getJsonConfig() ?>); // use yours instead
</script>

Using wrap() (this way, you don't have to change the original method name):

<script type="text/javascript">
    Product.OptionsPrice.prototype.formatPrice = Product.OptionsPrice.prototype.formatPrice.wrap(function(parent, price) {
        if (price % 1 === 0) { 
            this.priceFormat.requiredPrecision = 0; 
        }
        return parent(price);        
    });
    var optionsPrice = new Product.OptionsPrice(<?php echo $this->getJsonConfig() ?>);
</script>

See this link about Prototype's inheritance and the $super var.
Again, I saw code similar to @jholloman's suggestion used in Magento, so there's no problem going his way, but I thought you might want to know how to do this Prototype's way.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. I can appreciate the rationale for this approach. – iakkam Jan 23 '13 at 17:31

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