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I have a very quirky api that can only handle a single request at a time. Therefore, I need to ensure that every time a request is made, it goes into a queue, and that queue is executed one request at a time, until it is empty.

Normally, I just use jQuery's built in queue, since the site is already using jQuery. However, I was not sure if I could somehow decorate the $http service, or wrap it in another service that returns one promise at a time, or something else.

share|improve this question
    
How are you planning on using the queue? Are the callers all the same? Or do you want to have one promise returned per caller, but executed by $http in series? – Josh David Miller Jan 22 '13 at 20:26
    
>>Or do you want to have one promise returned per caller, but executed by $http in series? - this is what I am looking for. Essentially if I could get an interceptor able to delay the http request until all other requests before it have succeeded, that would be great. – Patrick Jan 22 '13 at 20:59
up vote 30 down vote accepted

Here is my solution for that: http://plnkr.co/edit/Tmjw0MCfSbBSgWRhFvcg

The idea is: each run of service add request to queue and return promise. When request to $http is finished resolve/refuse returned promise and execute next task from queue if any.

app.factory('srv', function($q,$http) {

  var queue=[];
  var execNext = function() {
    var task = queue[0];
    $http(task.c).then(function(data) {
      queue.shift();
      task.d.resolve(data);
      if (queue.length>0) execNext();
    }, function(err) {
      queue.shift();
      task.d.reject(err);
      if (queue.length>0) execNext();
    })
    ;
  }; 
  return function(config) {
    var d = $q.defer();
    queue.push({c:config,d:d});
    if (queue.length===1) execNext();            
    return d.promise;
  };
});

Looks quite simple :)

share|improve this answer
1  
This seems super promising, but I don't understand how you handle success/error responses using this. Thanks for your help! – Patrick Jan 22 '13 at 21:35
    
Rereading my comment made it seem less clear than I thought it was originally. When I call srv() in the controller, how do I set up a success and an error response (you use .then, which seems to mean there is only one possible reaction to the response). Thanks again – Patrick Jan 22 '13 at 21:43
    
@Patrick when you call srv, it returns a promise that has success, error, and then methods. See $q. – Josh David Miller Jan 22 '13 at 21:44
    
In case of successfull response I just resolve returned promise. In case of error I reject. So depending on response you will get called first callback or second callback of then function. Actually another solution is to chain promises, but it is not so ovious solution... – Valentyn Shybanov Jan 22 '13 at 21:45
    
@JoshDavidMiller actually success/error methods are extensions of $http and $q does not have these methods, so only then(successCallBack, errorCallBack) could be used. – Valentyn Shybanov Jan 22 '13 at 21:48

Richard: Your code works perfect but it also works with inner request like template or $templateProviders.

Here is solution to work only with external http requests

/**
 * Interceptor to queue HTTP requests.
 */
$httpProvider.interceptors.push(['$q', function ($q) {
    var _queue = [];

    /**
     * Executes the top function on the queue (if any).
     */
    function _executeTop() {
        if (_queue.length === 0) {
            return;
        }
        _queue[0]();
    }

    return {
        /**
         * Blocks each request on the queue. If the first request, processes immediately.
         */
        request: function (config) {
            if (config.url.substring(0, 4) == 'http') {
                var deferred = $q.defer();
                _queue.push(function () {
                    deferred.resolve(config);
                });
                if (_queue.length === 1) {
                    _executeTop();
                }
                return deferred.promise;
            } else {
                return config;
            }
        },
        /**
         * After each response completes, unblocks the next request.
         */
        response: function (response) {
            if (response.config.url.substring(0, 4) == 'http') {
                _queue.shift();
                _executeTop();
            }
            return response;
        },
        /**
         * After each response errors, unblocks the next request.
         */
        responseError: function (responseError) {
            if (responseError.config.url.substring(0, 4) == 'http') {
                _queue.shift();
                _executeTop();
            }
            return $q.reject(responseError);
        },
    };
}]);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the enhancement! I'm not sure why you need to re-check config.url in response/responseError though? If the call is non-http, I understand it won't block, but is there harm in shifting the queue anyway? – Richard Kennard Feb 26 '15 at 2:35
    
You have to use it because response is always executed – piernik Feb 26 '15 at 16:25
    
You have to use it because response and responseError are always executed - even without promise. That's why You have to check http – piernik Feb 26 '15 at 16:30
    
If you're using relative URL like /api/... then the check for config.url.substring will always fail. I've replaced with different property that I also use to queue specific type of calls, and not all. if (config.queue) { and then in the request e.g. $http.get(url, {queue:true}).. So you can choose which type of requests you want to queue. – tomvo May 11 '15 at 11:40

Building on Valentyn's great work above, I rolled this code into a standalone Angular (v1.2+) request/response interceptor. It will queue $http requests automatically without needing to rework your code to use srv() everywhere:

( function() {

'use strict';

angular.module( 'app' ).config( [ '$httpProvider', function( $httpProvider ) {

    /**
     * Interceptor to queue HTTP requests.
     */

    $httpProvider.interceptors.push( [ '$q', function( $q ) {

        var _queue = [];

        /**
         * Shifts and executes the top function on the queue (if any). Note this function executes asynchronously (with a timeout of 1). This
         * gives 'response' and 'responseError' chance to return their values and have them processed by their calling 'success' or 'error'
         * methods. This is important if 'success' involves updating some timestamp on some object which the next message in the queue relies
         * upon.
         */

        function _shiftAndExecuteTop() {

            setTimeout( function() {

                _queue.shift();

                if ( _queue.length > 0 ) {
                    _queue[0]();
                }
            }, 1 );
        }

        return {

            /**
             * Blocks each request on the queue. If the first request, processes immediately.
             */

            request: function( config ) {

                var deferred = $q.defer();
                _queue.push( function() {

                    deferred.resolve( config );
                } );

                if ( _queue.length === 1 ) {
                    _queue[0]();
                }

                return deferred.promise;
            },

            /**
             * After each response completes, unblocks the next request.
             */

            response: function( response ) {

                _shiftAndExecuteTop();
                return response;
            },

            /**
             * After each response errors, unblocks the next request.
             */

            responseError: function( responseError ) {

                _shiftAndExecuteTop();
                return $q.reject( responseError );
            },
        };
    } ] );
} ] );

} )();
share|improve this answer
.factory('qHttp', function($q, $http) {
  var queue = $q.when();

  return function queuedHttp(httpConf) {
    var f = function(data) {
      return $http(httpConf);
    };
    return queue = queue.then(f, f);
  };
})

How to use:

var apis = ['//httpbin.org/ip', '//httpbin.org/user-agent', '//httpbin.org/headers'];

for (var i = 0; i < 100; i++) {
  qHttp({
    method: 'get', 
    url: apis[i % apis.length]
  })
  .then(function(data) { 
    console.log(data.data); 
  });
}
share|improve this answer
1  
can you add a bit more context to explain how someone might use this in their app? – Simon East Oct 30 '15 at 6:14
    
i edited my answer, hope it's useful now – sergey Jan 17 at 1:12

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