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I want to create an NSIS installer that checks for the .NET Framework and installs it if it's not there. Can you point me to a script for this? I'm very new to NSIS.

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Hmm, I'm interested in this too! –  Maxim Zaslavsky Sep 18 '09 at 19:57
    
There are several examples in the NSIS wiki. Try this one. –  Travis Beale Sep 18 '09 at 20:02
    
You don't mention which .Net version, but an alternate solution would be to install it silently. <a href="blogs.msdn.com/brada/archive/2007/06/26/… install of the .NET Framework</a> <a href="msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… the .NET Framework 2.0</a> This is how I deal with the vcredist_x86.exe (i.e. just install silently always) –  crashmstr Sep 18 '09 at 20:09
    
Here is the way to check which version is installled try it forums.winamp.com/showthread.php?t=324928 –  dastanko Dec 19 '10 at 22:00
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5 Answers

Try the DotNetVer script. It uses LogicLib and is quite easy to use.

  • HasDotNet<version> checks if the specific version of .NET framework is installed. <version> can be replaced with the following values: 1.0, 1.1, 2.0, 3.0, 3.5, 4.0.
  • AtLeastDotNetServicePack checks if the .NET framework has a service pack version at least as specified.
  • IsDotNetServicePack checks if the .NET framework has a service pack version exactly as specified.
  • HasDotNetClientProfile checks if the .NET framework is a client profiled install.
  • HasDotNetFullProfile checks if the .NET framework is a full install.

Sample:

${If} ${HasDotNet4.0}
    DetailPrint "Microsoft .NET Framework 4.0 installed."
    ${If} ${DOTNETVER_4_0} AtLeastDotNetServicePack 1
        DetailPrint "Microsoft .NET Framework 4.0 is at least SP1."
    ${Else}
        DetailPrint "Microsoft .NET Framework 4.0 SP1 not installed."
    ${EndIf}
    ${If} ${DOTNETVER_4_0} HasDotNetClientProfile 1
        DetailPrint "Microsoft .NET Framework 4.0 (Client Profile) available."
    ${EndIf}
    ${If} ${DOTNETVER_4_0} HasDotNetFullProfile 1
        DetailPrint "Microsoft .NET Framework 4.0 (Full Profile) available."
    ${EndIf}
    ${If} ${DOTNETVER_4_0} HasDotNetFullProfile 0
        DetailPrint "Microsoft .NET Framework 4.0 (Full Profile) not available."
    ${EndIf}
${EndIf}
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I had an issue with the "DotNET.nsh" pluging, which you can find somwhere, and simply used this solution (for .net 4.0, full install - which I needed, you can as well limit it to the client package):

ClearErrors
ReadRegDWORD $0 HKLM "Software\Microsoft\Net Framework Setup\NDP\v4\Full" "Install"
IfErrors dotNet40NotFound
IntCmp $0 1 dotNet40Found
dotNet40NotFound: 
    Banner::show /set 76 "Installing .NET Framework 4.0" "Please wait"  
    File /nonfatal "tools\dotNetFx40_Full_setup.exe"
    ; if you don't have $TEMP already, add here:
    ; SetOutPath $TEMP
    ExecWait "$TEMP\dotNetFx40_Full_setup.exe /passive /norestart"
    Delete /REBOOTOK "$TEMP\dotNetFx40_Full_setup.exe"
    Banner::destroy
dotNet40Found:

The banner stuff is optional, you could just use DetailPrint or the like. This way, you pull along the Web installer for .NET 4.0, but it's pretty small (as opposed to .NET versions which didn't have one). The installer does the downloading if it's needed, and you don't need kilometers of NSIS code.

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Probably not the right reason for an upvote, but this script code made more sense to me than any other examples out there of doing this. Thanks. –  Craig Brett Jul 23 '13 at 23:11
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!define DOT_MAJOR "2"
!define DOT_MINOR "0"

Function IsDotNetInstalled

  StrCpy $0 "0"
  StrCpy $1 "SOFTWARE\Microsoft\.NETFramework" ;registry entry to look in.
  StrCpy $2 0

  StartEnum:
    ;Enumerate the versions installed.
    EnumRegKey $3 HKLM "$1\policy" $2

    ;If we don't find any versions installed, it's not here.
    StrCmp $3 "" noDotNet notEmpty

    ;We found something.
    notEmpty:
      ;Find out if the RegKey starts with 'v'.  
      ;If it doesn't, goto the next key.
      StrCpy $4 $3 1 0
      StrCmp $4 "v" +1 goNext
      StrCpy $4 $3 1 1

      ;It starts with 'v'.  Now check to see how the installed major version
      ;relates to our required major version.
      ;If it's equal check the minor version, if it's greater, 
      ;we found a good RegKey.
      IntCmp $4 ${DOT_MAJOR} +1 goNext yesDotNetReg
      ;Check the minor version.  If it's equal or greater to our requested 
      ;version then we're good.
      StrCpy $4 $3 1 3
      IntCmp $4 ${DOT_MINOR} yesDotNetReg goNext yesDotNetReg

    goNext:
      ;Go to the next RegKey.
      IntOp $2 $2 + 1
      goto StartEnum

  yesDotNetReg:
    ;Now that we've found a good RegKey, let's make sure it's actually
    ;installed by getting the install path and checking to see if the 
    ;mscorlib.dll exists.
    EnumRegValue $2 HKLM "$1\policy\$3" 0
    ;$2 should equal whatever comes after the major and minor versions 
    ;(ie, v1.1.4322)
    StrCmp $2 "" noDotNet
    ReadRegStr $4 HKLM $1 "InstallRoot"
    ;Hopefully the install root isn't empty.
    StrCmp $4 "" noDotNet
    ;build the actuall directory path to mscorlib.dll.
    StrCpy $4 "$4$3.$2\mscorlib.dll"
    IfFileExists $4 yesDotNet noDotNet

  noDotNet:
    ;Nope, something went wrong along the way.  Looks like the proper .NETFramework isn't installed.  
    Push "NOK"
    Return

  yesDotNet:
    ;Everything checks out.  Go on with the rest of the installation.
    Push "OK"
    Return

FunctionEnd
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The following code checks if .Net 3.5 is installed, and if not, it will install it silently. It uses a macro that checks wether a specified key exists in the registry.

The macro:

# This macro checks if a certain key exists in the registry
!macro IfKeyExists ROOT MAIN_KEY KEY
    push $R0
    push $R1

    !define Index 'Line${__LINE__}'

    StrCpy $R1 "0"

    "${Index}-Loop:"
    ; Check for Key
    EnumRegKey $R0 ${ROOT} "${MAIN_KEY}" "$R1"
    StrCmp $R0 "" "${Index}-False"
    IntOp $R1 $R1 + 1
    StrCmp $R0 "${KEY}" "${Index}-True" "${Index}-Loop"

    "${Index}-True:"
    ;Return 1 if found
    push "1"
    goto "${Index}-End"

    "${Index}-False:"
    ;Return 0 if not found
    push "0"
    goto "${Index}-End"

    "${Index}-End:"
    !undef Index
    exch 2
    pop $R0
    pop $R1
!macroend

The function:

# The function that checks if .net is already installed
Function CheckDotNet
!insertmacro IfKeyExists HKLM "Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Uninstall" "{CE2CDD62-0124-36CA-84D3-9F4DCF5C5BD9}"
Pop $R0
${If} $R0 == 0 # not installed NOTE: /q:a means this will be a silent installation
    ExecWait "$EXEDIR\dotnetfx35.exe /q:a"
    Goto endPrerequisites
${EndIf}

    endPrerequisites:
        # Code to execute after checking/installing (if necessary) .Net 
        # You can just put "Goto +2" here, in order to go to the next section/function
FunctionEnd

In order for this to work, you have to call CheckDotNet somewhere in the .onInit function and make sure that dotnetfx35.exe is packed in your installer in the $EXEDIR (of course you can change these parameters however you wish).

For other versions of .Net, I suppose the only different thing will be the registry key specified in the IfKeyExistsmacro parameter (now it is {CE2CDD62-0124-36CA-84D3-9F4DCF5C5BD9})

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ReadRegDWORD $0 HKLM "SOFTWARE\Microsoft\NET Framework Setup\NDP\v4\Client" Install

Then you should check $0. It's up to you how.

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What do you consider that this adds in comparison with the other answers? It doesn't say what it should be, nor does it go installing it. –  Chris Morgan Dec 16 '11 at 13:47
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