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I have a collection of objects that I need to write to a binary file.

I need the bytes in the file to be compact so I can't use BinaryFormatter. BinaryFormatter throws in all sorts of info for deserialization needs.

If I try byte[] myBytes = (byte[])myObject I get a runtime exception.

I need this to be fast so I'd rather not be copying arrays of bytes around. I'd just like the cast byte[] myBytes = (byte[])myObject to work!

OK just to be clear, I cannot have any metadata in the output file. Just the object bytes. Packed object-to-object. Based on answers received, it looks like I'll be writing low-level Buffer.BlockCopy code. Perhaps using unsafe code.

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10 Answers

Convert an object to byte array:

// Convert an object to a byte array
private byte[] ObjectToByteArray(Object obj)
{
    if(obj == null)
        return null;
    BinaryFormatter bf = new BinaryFormatter();
    MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream();
    bf.Serialize(ms, obj);
    return ms.ToArray();
}

You just need copy this function to your code and send to it the object that you need convert to byte array. If you need convert the byte array to object again you can use the funcion below:

// Convert a byte array to an Object
private Object ByteArrayToObject(byte[] arrBytes)
{
    MemoryStream memStream = new MemoryStream();
    BinaryFormatter binForm = new BinaryFormatter();
    memStream.Write(arrBytes, 0, arrBytes.Length);
    memStream.Seek(0, SeekOrigin.Begin);
    Object obj = (Object) binForm.Deserialize(memStream);
    return obj;
}

You can use this funcions with custom classes. You just need add [Serializable] attribute in your class to enable serialization

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I tried this and it added all sorts of metadata. The OP said he did not want metadata. –  user316117 Jan 23 '13 at 19:47
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Well a cast from myObject to byte[] is never going to work unless you've got an explicit conversion or if myObject is a byte[]. You need a serialization framework of some kind. There are plenty out there, including Protocol Buffers which is near and dear to me. It's pretty "lean and mean" in terms of both space and time.

You'll find that almost all serialization frameworks have significant restrictions on what you can serialize, however - Protocol Buffers more than some, due to being cross-platform.

If you can give more requirements, we can help you out more - but it's never going to be as simple as casting...

EDIT: Just to respond to this:

I need my binary file to contain the object's bytes. Only the bytes, no metadata whatsoever. Packed object-to-object. So I'll be implementing custom serialization.

Please bear in mind that the bytes in your objects are quite often references... so you'll need to work out what to do with them.

I suspect you'll find that designing and implementing your own custom serialization framework is harder than you imagine.

I would personally recommend that if you only need to do this for a few specific types, you don't bother trying to come up with a general serialization framework. Just implement an instance method and a static method in all the types you need:

public void WriteTo(Stream stream)
public static WhateverType ReadFrom(Stream stream)

One thing to bear in mind: everything becomes more tricky if you've got inheritance involved. Without inheritance, if you know what type you're starting with, you don't need to include any type information. Of course, there's also the matter of versioning - do you need to worry about backward and forward compatibility with different versions of your types?

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Is it more correct for me to refer to this as "protobuf-csharp-port" (Google-code), or "dotnet-protobufs" (Git)? –  Marc Gravell Sep 18 '09 at 20:16
    
I need my binary file to contain the object's bytes. Only the bytes, no metadata whatsoever. Packed object-to-object. So I'll be implementing custom serialization. –  chuckhlogan Sep 18 '09 at 20:46
3  
The risk of zero metadata is that you are then very version-intolerant, as it has very few ways of allowing flexibility before it is too late. Protocol buffers is pretty data-dense. Do you really need that extra turn of the screw? –  Marc Gravell Sep 18 '09 at 21:14
    
@Marc: And of course for integers, PB can end up being denser than the raw bytes... –  Jon Skeet Sep 18 '09 at 21:40
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If you want the serialized data to be really compact, you can write serialization methods yourself. That way you will have a minimum of overhead.

Example:

public class MyClass {

   public int Id { get; set; }
   public string Name { get; set; }

   public byte[] Serialize() {
      using (MemoryStream m = new MemoryStream()) {
         using (BinaryWriter writer = new BinaryWriter(m)) {
            writer.Write(Id);
            writer.Write(Name);
         }
         return m.ToArray();
      }
   }

   public static MyClass Desserialize(byte[] data) {
      MyClass result = new MyClass();
      using (MemoryStream m = new MemoryStream(data)) {
         using (BinaryReader reader = new BinaryReader(m)) {
            result.Id = reader.ReadInt32();
            result.Name = reader.ReadString();
         }
      }
      return result;
   }

}
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You are really talking about serialization, which can take many forms. Since you want small and binary, protocol buffers may be a viable option - giving version tolerance and portability as well. Unlike BinaryFormatter, the protocol buffers wire format doesn't include all the type metadata; just very terse markers to identify data.

In .NET there are a few implementations; in particular

I'd humbly argue that protobuf-net (which I wrote) allows more .NET-idiomatic usage with typical C# classes ("regular" protocol-buffers tends to demand code-generation); for example:

[ProtoContract]
public class Person {
   [ProtoMember(1)]
   public int Id {get;set;}
   [ProtoMember(2)]
   public string Name {get;set;}
}
....
Person person = new Person { Id = 123, Name = "abc" };
Serializer.Serialize(destStream, person);
...
Person anotherPerson = Serializer.Deserialize<Person>(sourceStream);
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Even "terse markers" are still metadata. My understanding of what the OP wanted was nothing but the data in the object. So, for example, if the object was a struct with 2 32-bit integers, then he would expect the result to be a byte array of 8 bytes. –  user316117 Jan 23 '13 at 19:52
    
@user316117 which is then a real pain for versioning. Each approach has advantages and disadvantages. –  Marc Gravell Jan 23 '13 at 20:30
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Take a look at Serialization, a technique to "convert" an entire object to a byte stream. You may send it to the network or write it into a file and then restore it back to an object later.

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I think chuckhlogan explicitly declined that (Formatter==Serialization). –  Henk Holterman Sep 18 '09 at 20:12
    
@Henk - it depends what the reasons are; he mentioned the extra info, which I take to be type metadata and field info; you can use serialization without that overhead; just not with BinaryFormatter. –  Marc Gravell Sep 18 '09 at 20:19
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I took Crystalonics' answer and turned them into extension methods. I hope someone else will find them useful:

public static byte[] SerializeToByteArray(this object obj)
{
    if (obj == null)
    {
        return null;
    }
    var bf = new BinaryFormatter();
    using (var ms = new MemoryStream())
    {
        bf.Serialize(ms, obj);
        return ms.ToArray();
    }
}

public static T Deserialize<T>(this byte[] byteArray) where T : class
{
    if (byteArray == null)
    {
        return null;
    }
    using (var memStream = new MemoryStream())
    {
        var binForm = new BinaryFormatter();
        memStream.Write(byteArray, 0, byteArray.Length);
        memStream.Seek(0, SeekOrigin.Begin);
        var obj = (T)binForm.Deserialize(memStream);
        return obj;
    }
}
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To access the memory of an object directly (to do a "core dump") you'll need to head into unsafe code.

If you want something more compact than BinaryWriter or a raw memory dump will give you, then you need to write some custom serialisation code that extracts the critical information from the object and packs it in an optimal way.

edit P.S. It's very easy to wrap the BinaryWriter approach into a DeflateStream to compress the data, which will usually roughly halve the size of the data.

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Unsafe code isn't enough. C# and CLR still won't let you take a raw pointer to a managed object even in unsafe code, or put two object references in a union. –  Pavel Minaev Sep 18 '09 at 20:05
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If you just had text or something similar to store, you could do something like: byte[] byteArray = Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes(myObject.text);

Otherwise, you're going to have to serialize in some more involved way.

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Even the act of running a string through an encoding could be described as "serialization" - it certainly serves the same purpose: producing a sequence of raw bytes that can be used for storage/transfer. –  Marc Gravell Sep 18 '09 at 20:20
    
My objects include byte arrays, integers, and strings. The GetBytes won't work on it's own. I can, however, use a combination of GetBytes and BitConverter to accomplish what I need, in a custom serialization method. –  chuckhlogan Sep 18 '09 at 20:49
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I use http://www.codeproject.com/KB/cs/FastSerialization.aspx it has worked well for our company

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// Convert an object to a byte array
private byte[] ObjectToByteArray(Object obj)
{
       if(obj == null)
       return null;
       BinaryFormatter bf = new BinaryFormatter();
       MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream();
       bf.Serialize(ms, obj);
       return ms.ToArray();
}

// Convert a byte array to an Object
private Object ByteArrayToObject(byte[] arrBytes)
{
      MemoryStream memStream = new MemoryStream();
      BinaryFormatter binForm = new BinaryFormatter();
      memStream.Write(arrBytes, 0, arrBytes.Length);
      memStream.Seek(0, SeekOrigin.Begin);
      Object obj = (Object) binForm.Deserialize(memStream);
      return obj;
}
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