Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to list all files and folders in a given directory in C, the following code errors out and i cant figure out whats wrong

#include <sys/types.h>
#include <dirent.h>
#include <regex.h>
#include <stdio.h>

#include <unistd.h>
#include <pwd.h>

enum {
    WALK_OK = 0,
    WALK_BADPATTERN,
    WALK_BADOPEN,
};

int walk_directories(const char *dir, const char *pattern, char* strings[])
{
    struct dirent *entry;
    regex_t reg;
    DIR *d; 
    int i = 0;
    //char array[256][256];

    if (regcomp(&reg, pattern, REG_EXTENDED | REG_NOSUB))
    return WALK_BADPATTERN;
    if (!(d = opendir(dir)))
    return WALK_BADOPEN;
    while (entry = readdir(d))
    if (!regexec(&reg, entry->d_name, 0, NULL, 0) )
            //puts(entry->d_name);
        strings[i] = (entry->d_name);
        i++;
    closedir(d);
    regfree(&reg);

    return WALK_OK;
}

void main()
{
    struct passwd *pw = getpwuid(getuid());
    char *homedir = pw->pw_dir;
    strcat(homedir, "/.themes");

    int n = 0;
    char *array[256][100];
    char *array2[256][100];

    walk_directories(homedir, "", array);
        for (n = 0; n < 256; n++)
        {
            //do stuff here later, but just print it for now
            printf ("%s\n", array[n]);
        }

    walk_directories("/usr/share/themes", "", array2);
        for (n = 0; n < 256; n++)
        {
            //do stuff here later, but just print it for now
            printf ("%s\n", array2[n]);
        }
}

The error at compile time is

test2.c: In function ‘main’:
test2.c:42:2: warning: incompatible implicit declaration of built-in function ‘strcat’ [enabled by default]
test2.c:48:2: warning: passing argument 3 of ‘walk_directories’ from incompatible pointer type [enabled by default]
test2.c:15:5: note: expected ‘char **’ but argument is of type ‘char * (*)[100]’
test2.c:52:6: warning: format ‘%s’ expects argument of type ‘char *’, but argument 2 has type ‘char **’ [-Wformat]
test2.c:55:2: warning: passing argument 3 of ‘walk_directories’ from incompatible pointer type [enabled by default]
test2.c:15:5: note: expected ‘char **’ but argument is of type ‘char * (*)[100]’
test2.c:59:6: warning: format ‘%s’ expects argument of type ‘char *’, but argument 2 has type ‘char **’ [-Wformat]

If it helps, I've implemented what I want already in python, this is the desired result for C

import os
DATA_DIR = "/usr/share"

def walk_directories(dirs, filter_func):
    valid = []
    try:
    for thdir in dirs:
        if os.path.isdir(thdir):
            for t in os.listdir(thdir):
                if filter_func(os.path.join(thdir, t)):
                     valid.append(t)
    except:
    logging.critical("Error parsing directories", exc_info=True)
    return valid

def _get_valid_themes():
    """ Only shows themes that have variations for gtk+-3 and gtk+-2 """
    dirs = ( os.path.join(DATA_DIR, "themes"),
         os.path.join(os.path.expanduser("~"), ".themes"))
    valid = walk_directories(dirs, lambda d:
            os.path.exists(os.path.join(d, "gtk-2.0")) and \
            os.path.exists(os.path.join(d, "gtk-3.0")))
    return valid

print(_get_valid_themes())

thank you

[EDIT] thanks for the help, only problem im having now is the printf's all spit out rubbish instead of what i expected, ive tried a few things and the while loop looks like this now

    while (entry = readdir(d))
    if (!regexec(&reg, entry->d_name, 0, NULL, 0) )
            //printf("%s\n",entry->d_name);
        strcpy(strings[i], (entry->d_name));
        //strings[i] = (entry->d_name);
        printf("%i\n",i);
        i++;
    closedir(d);

the i doesnt get printed properly either, this is all i get from the 3 printf statements

0
Adwaita2





















\@




0
Radiance

��





\@



�K��
� `���
����
�


��
�
.N=

�O��
�

�

should mention that if i enable

       printf("%s\n",entry->d_name);

then it prints the expected output though

share|improve this question
1  
Actually, you don't have any errors. The type of diagnostic you are getting is called "warning", and you can resolve it by including <string.h>. Google. –  user529758 Jan 22 '13 at 18:32
1  
@H2CO3, he does have some errors, it's just that the compiler is called them warnings. For example, the mismatched pointer warnings it's showing will cause bizarre operation. I'd call that an error in the program, even though the compiler deems them 'warning' and not 'error'. –  Carl Norum Jan 22 '13 at 18:42
    
@CarlNorum In this case, he should have posted the errors as well. (You're right anyway, one should pay attention to warnings as well, but still... Wording...) –  user529758 Jan 22 '13 at 19:02
    
Also, void main()? Barf. –  Carl Norum Jan 22 '13 at 19:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
  1. You should include string.h to get the declaration of strcat(3).

  2. In your declaration:

    int walk_directories(const char *dir, const char *pattern, char* strings[])
    

    The char *strings[] is just syntactic sugar meaning char **strings. Since you're passing a 2D array, that won't work. It looks to me like you're intending to make two arrays of strings, but that's not what these declarations do:

    char *array[256][100];
    char *array2[256][100];
    

    You probably don't want the *s there. If you take them off, you can change the signature of walk_directories to this:

    int walk_directories(const char *dir, const char *pattern, char strings[][100])
    

    And it should work, with the necessary changes inside your function to match. As a bonus, this change will make your printf calls start working, too.

  3. It looks like you're missing some braces around your while loop body.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks a lot!, that was the problem with the arrays. –  Mike Jan 22 '13 at 19:25
    
got a minor problem with the printf calls now though, ive added it to the main question, they only seem to put out rubbish characters, its some problem with the code in the while loop it seems. –  Mike Jan 22 '13 at 19:26
    
If you print the strings in the loop where you do the strcpy, are they right? Do you fill the arrays with all 256 strings? –  Carl Norum Jan 22 '13 at 19:34
    
yes, there right, i dont fill all 256 no, i just picked that as its more than the number of arrays ill ever get, it seems the braces were the problem, thanks again :) –  Mike Jan 22 '13 at 20:14

The first warning indicates that the compiler cannot figure out what arguments the strcat() function is supposed to take. Since this is a standard C function, this warning means that you are missing a #include directive. Specifically, you need to #include <string.h>. When you fix this, you may find that you get different errors and warnings, so work from there.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.