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I found two method to convert byte[] to structure. but I don't know if there is any difference between these two methods? can anyone know which is better (performance, ...)?

#1:

public static T ByteArrayToStructure<T>(byte[] buffer)
{
    int length = buffer.Length;
    IntPtr i = Marshal.AllocHGlobal(length);
    Marshal.Copy(buffer, 0, i, length);
    T result = (T)Marshal.PtrToStructure(i, typeof(T));
    Marshal.FreeHGlobal(i);
    return result;
}

#2:

public static T ByteArrayToStructure<T>(byte[] buffer)
{
    GCHandle handle = GCHandle.Alloc(buffer, GCHandleType.Pinned);
    T result = (T)Marshal.PtrToStructure(handle.AddrOfPinnedObject(), typeof(T));
    handle.Free();
    return result;
}
share|improve this question
    
Better in what terms? By the way, I think the second one does not do what you expect. Did you test them? If so, show us the code you used to make sure the methods work as expected. –  GameScripting Jan 22 '13 at 18:47
    
better in performance (i edited my post). are you sure #2 doesn't work? –  Hossein Narimani Rad Jan 22 '13 at 18:49
    
OK. so there are some differences. can you tell more? –  Hossein Narimani Rad Jan 22 '13 at 18:51
3  
If you want to compare performance in your specific case, you have to measure it by yourself. –  svick Jan 22 '13 at 18:51
2  
As a question about Marshal.AllocHGlobal() vs GCHandle.Alloc() for this specific case it is rather interesting and doesn't deserve the standard "measure yourself" blurbs. –  Henk Holterman Jan 22 '13 at 18:56

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I did a benchmark for you using the following code:

const int ILITERATIONS = 10000000;

const long testValue = 8616519696198198198;
byte[] testBytes = BitConverter.GetBytes(testValue);

// warumup JIT
ByteArrayToStructure1<long>(testBytes);
ByteArrayToStructure2<long>(testBytes);

Stopwatch stopwatch = new Stopwatch();
stopwatch.Start();

for (int i = 0; i < ILITERATIONS; i++)
{
    ByteArrayToStructure1<long>(testBytes);
}

stopwatch.Stop();
Console.WriteLine("1: " + stopwatch.ElapsedMilliseconds);

stopwatch.Reset();

stopwatch.Start();

for (int i = 0; i < ILITERATIONS; i++)
{
    ByteArrayToStructure2<long>(testBytes);
}

stopwatch.Stop();
Console.WriteLine("2: " + stopwatch.ElapsedMilliseconds);

stopwatch.Reset();

stopwatch.Start();

for (int i = 0; i < ILITERATIONS; i++)
{
    BitConverter.ToInt64(testBytes, 0);
}

stopwatch.Stop();
Console.WriteLine("3: " + stopwatch.ElapsedMilliseconds);

Console.ReadLine();

I came to the following results:

1: 2927
2: 2803
3: 51
share|improve this answer
    
Side note: make sure to have warmup calls to exclude JIT and see if you actually call 2 different methods... –  Alexei Levenkov Jan 22 '13 at 19:09
    
@AlexeiLevenkov thanks for the suggestion, updated my answer :) –  GameScripting Jan 22 '13 at 19:19

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