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I'm currently working on a homework assignment for my C++ class to make a multi-player Tic-tac-toe game but I'm having trouble with the input part of the program (I've got almost everything else running).

Anyway, my goal is to prompt the current player for a row and a column in the format row,col. Then I need to place their mark in a two dimensional array that represents the game board.

I thought that I could simply read their input into a char array using cin and then take the 0 position and 2 position in that array and I would have my two numbers from their input. However, if I do this, I end up with the ASCII values of the input, not the number (for example, I get 49 instead of '1').

I feel like I'm probably overlooking something really simple, so any input would be very helpful and much appreciated. Here is what I had:

void getEntry(char XorO, char gameBoard[GRID_SIZE][GRID_SIZE])
{
    char entry[3];

    cout << XorO << " - enter row,col: ";
    cin >> entry;

    int row = entry[0];
    int col = entry[2];

    //Then I would use the row, col to pass the XorO value into the gameBoard
}
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1  
Can you use std::string instead? –  BobbyDigital Jan 22 '13 at 19:04
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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Note that you are reading into a char array. When you convert the individual chars into ints, you will get the ASCII (or Unicode) values of the characters '0', '1', or '2', not the integer values 0, 1, or 2. To convert a single digit, you can use a useful property of ASCII codes: digit characters are sequential. This means that you can sutract the code for '0' from any digit to get the corresponding integer value. For example

row = entry[0] - '0';
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Oh, that explains it, not subtracting zero, but rather the value for zero, that makes sens why that would work. Thank you! –  tforste Jan 22 '13 at 19:17
    
@user2001427 It is very important for a C++ programmer to be aware of the type of data used. There is a huge difference between representing zero as a char ('0') and representing zero as an int (0). The same goes for any other single digit. –  Code-Guru Jan 22 '13 at 19:19
    
Type doesn't really matter it all boils down to numbers :P What you're referring to is literal values. As far as the compiler and computer is concerned '0' is just 48. I can do char c = 48; and get the same result as char c = '0'; –  Jesus Ramos Jan 22 '13 at 19:22
    
@JesusRamos Which is exactly the meaning of the char type. By your example, type does matter. It's the reason that the two initializations have the same result. –  Code-Guru Jan 22 '13 at 19:24
    
@Code-Guru Not really, types are just container sizes (except for the case of signed and unsigned which changes usage), C++ focuses on type so much people forget what's they're actually storing. Something like char * is not necessarily a string but can also be a pointer to a byte buffer which you don't want to interpret as characters. –  Jesus Ramos Jan 22 '13 at 19:27
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To get the number just do

row = entry[0] - '0';
col = entry[2] - '0';

This will convert from ASCII to the actual digit.

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Oh wow, that was incredibly simple. Thank you very much. I can't believe I just spent almost two hours trying to find an answer for that. I'm just curious, why does simply subtracting '0' convert it to the actual character? –  tforste Jan 22 '13 at 19:08
    
@user2001427 See my anwer ;-) –  Code-Guru Jan 22 '13 at 19:16
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Let operator>> deal with interpreting the numbers:

void getEntry(char XorO, char gameBoard[GRID_SIZE][GRID_SIZE])
{
    int row, col;
    char comma;

    cout << XorO << " - enter row,col: ";
    std::cin >> row >> comma >> col; 

    if( (!std::cin) || (comma != ',') ) {
      std::cout << "Bogus input\n";
      return;
    }

    //Then I would use the row, col to pass the XorO value into the gameBoard
}
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+1 For suggesting a very good alternative solution. –  Code-Guru Jan 22 '13 at 19:17
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void getEntry(char XorO, char gameBoard[GRID_SIZE][GRID_SIZE])
{
    char entry[3];

    cout << XorO << " - enter row,col: ";
    cin >> entry;

    int row = entry[0] - '0';
    int col = entry[2] - '0';

    //if grid_size <= 9
}
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Right, Grid_Size is a constant that allows me to change the game from 3 x 3 to a 4x4 or higher. –  tforste Jan 22 '13 at 19:20
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