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I just stumbled upon css specificity, while trying to change the pagination style of my theme.

I'm using twitter-bootstrap as a base-template, but I want to change pagination.

Specifically, I want to remove the pagination border that comes with will-paginate bootstrap :

The will-paginate/bootstrap

.pagination a {
    -moz-border-bottom-colors: none;
    -moz-border-left-colors: none;
    -moz-border-right-colors: none;
    -moz-border-top-colors: none;
    border-color: #DDDDDD;
    border-image: none;
    border-style: solid;
    border-width: 1px 1px 1px 0;
    float: left;
    line-height: 34px;
    padding: 0 14px;
    text-decoration: none;
}

I just need this :

.pagination a {

    float: left;
    line-height: 34px;
    padding: 0 14px;
}

The problem is that if i set this in my custom.css.scss file, then bootstrap specificity is higher (check this great explanation on specificity) than mine. I even tried and use !important, but it still did not got my specificity higher.

I have solved this problem by just using the Equal specificity rule - the one that comes last, with equal specificity, is the one that counts, and just put :

.pagination a {
        -moz-border-bottom-colors: none;
        -moz-border-left-colors: none;
        -moz-border-right-colors: none;
        -moz-border-top-colors: none;
        border-color: #DDDDDD;
        border-image: none;
        border-style: none;
        border-width: 1px 1px 1px 0;
        float: left;
        line-height: 34px;
        padding: 0 14px;
        text-decoration: none;
    }

But this is just trashy css, because i don't need the border at all...

What would you suggest?

share|improve this question
    
Itsalltime: you're misunderstanding specificity. Even if you create a really specific css selector that is much more specific than the CSS you wish to override, it still only overrides css you actually declare. If the underlying css declares a value for border, but your very specific css doesn't, border won't disappear. You would need to define the border to be none. –  Jhong Jan 28 '13 at 0:50
    
so you are saying is that specificity relates to the attribute, and not the class ? –  MrWater Jan 28 '13 at 22:53
    
I'm not sure if OOP classes is a helpful way of thinking about it. CSS doesn't behave like them. A CSS selector is not a separate namespace. Don't over-think specificity. Specificity is a combination of the CSS selector, the attribute, and the order of definition. Basically, think of CSS as "cascading" rules -- they are parsed in order, and later rules can override previous ones if they are equally or more specific. It's not more complicated than that. –  Jhong Jan 29 '13 at 6:59
    
Thank you Jhong...What i may interpret then is that the specificity rules are applied on a property level and not so much on a selector level. I mean, even if selector 1 is more specific than 2, if 2 has properties that 1 does not have, (or the other way around), my element will have a conjunction of both 1 and 2 selector's properties. The only way i may find to force the same identical properties to surpass the others is either define the property as !important, or enforce that it is defined by last. –  MrWater Jan 30 '13 at 14:36
1  
Yes. Because they're not classes that you're setting up in a namespace that are compiled and run -- they are just instructions to a renderer that get parsed in the order they are encountered. Just like instucting a home decorator. If you've already told him to paint the wall red, it will be red. If you then tell him later to move the wall, it will still be red, unless you tell him to paint it again. They are just a set of instructions, not classes. –  Jhong Jan 31 '13 at 8:05

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Just try border: none; instead of resetting every sub-property.

Also, I just checked Bootstrap's selector for pagination and it's more specific than that:

.pagination ul > li > a, .pagination ul > li > span

Try using that selector instead for your border: none.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't know if I am following you here. –  MrWater Jan 22 '13 at 19:35
    
Hmmm, I can get the result I wanted with : .pagination a { border:none; float: left; line-height: 34px; padding: 0 14px; text-decoration: none; }, but now I am a bit lost...How come the specificity of this is bigger than the bootstrap default? –  MrWater Jan 22 '13 at 19:45
    
Depends on the exact Bootstrap CSS you're using. I figured you used the current one, available on their website but maybe it's different. Only you can tell. –  jgthms Jan 22 '13 at 23:01

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