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I've got two different arrays that I'm using. With one, I'm getting the exact results that I want, the other, not so much. I'm filing the arrays with by reading from a text file similar to this:

2597
283



4
723
21
82
426

The first five lines would be the customer IDs. There is always 5 lines but they don't always have a value. The next line is the number of vendors, then followed by the vendor ids.

void use_arrays()
{
    int
        i,
        customer_count,
        *customer_ids,
        vendor_count,
        *vendor_ids;

    customer_ids = malloc(sizeof(int));
    vendor_ids = malloc(sizeof(int));
    fill_arrays(&customer_count, customer_ids, &vendor_count, vendor_ids);

    for (i = 0; i < customer_count; i++)
    {
        printf("Customer[%d]: %d\n", i, customer_ids[i]);
    }

    for (i = 0; i < vendor_count; i++)
    {
        printf("Vendor[%d]: %d\n", i, vendor_ids[i]);
    }

    free(customer_ids);
    free(vendor_ids);
}

void fill_arrays(int *customer_count, int *customer_ids, int *vendor_count, int *vendor_ids)
{
    int
        i,
        *temp,
        customer_id,
        vendor_id,
        num_cust = 0;
    FILE
        *inp_file;
    char
        *endptr = NULL,
        buffer[500];

    inp_file = fopen(g_filename, "r");

    for (i = 0; i < 5; i++) /* Can't be more than 5 customers */
    {
        fgets(buffer, sizeof(buffer), inp_file);
        customer_id = strtol(buffer, &endptr, 0);
        if (customer_id != 0)
        {
            customer_ids[i] = customer_id;
        temp = realloc(customer_ids, (i+2)*sizeof(int));
        if (temp != NULL) 
            {
               customer_ids = temp;
            } 
        else 
        {
               printf("Couldn't allocate memory\n");
            }
        num_cust++;
        }
    }
    *customer_count = num_cust;

    /* Next is number of vendor ids*/
    fgets(buffer, sizeof(buffer), inp_file);
    *vendor_count = strtol(buffer, &endptr, 0);

    temp = realloc(vendor_ids, *vendor_count*sizeof(int));
    if (temp != NULL) 
    {
        vendor_ids = temp;
    } 
    else 
    {
        printf("Couldn't allocate memory\n");
    }

    for (i = 0; i < *vendor_count; i++)
    {
        fgets(buffer, sizeof(buffer), inp_file);
        vendor_id = strtol(buffer, &endptr, 0);
        if (vendor_id != 0)
        {
        vendor_ids[i] = vendor_id;
        }
    }
    fclose(inp_file);
}

Once the arrays print out, customer_ids is showing the correct numbers but vendor_ids is printing out random numbers from memory. To be more frustrating, it prints the vendors correctly from inside fill_arrays.

share|improve this question
    
a good tip is to always check return codes, normally when you assume something it is often wrong. –  CyberSpock Jan 22 '13 at 19:21
    
reallocating is a costly operation, when you reallocate, allocate a chunk instead. if u know that you are reading 5 numbers allocate 5 numbers at start –  CyberSpock Jan 22 '13 at 19:22
    
I'm reallocating because I don't know how many numbers there will be. There could be 5, but it might just be one also. –  vikingsfan19 Jan 22 '13 at 19:45
    
yes but when you reallocate you could say allocate 10 objects at one time instead of just one. then if u use up those 10, allocate another 10 –  CyberSpock Jan 22 '13 at 19:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you want to modify vendor_ids the way you do in fill_arrays, then you have to pass it in as a pointer to a pointer:

fill_arrays(int *customer_count, int *customer_ids, int *vendor_count, int **vendor_ids)

Call it like this:

fill_arrays(&customer_count, customer_ids, &vendor_count, &vendor_ids);

Then you can realloc like so:

temp = realloc(*vendor_ids, *vendor_count*sizeof(int));
if (temp != NULL) 
{
    *vendor_ids = temp;
} 

Also, at the end of your function:

vendor_ids[i] = vendor_id;

will have to change to

(*vendor_ids)[i] = vendor_id;

You will also have to make the same changes to customer_ids. The fact that customer_ids was working while vendor_ids wasn't was probably due to your use of realloc. If realloc decides that the memory block has to be reallocated in a new location, you'll run into these problems but if reallocates the memory in the same location, your pointer that you passed in is still pointing there. Since you never know if realloc is going to make that descision or not, both customer_ids and vendor_ids should be passed in as pointers to pointers.

share|improve this answer
1  
customer_ids will require the same. –  netcoder Jan 22 '13 at 19:24
    
@netcoder +1 Added a blurb at the end about that. Thanks for the heads up. –  Gunther Fox Jan 22 '13 at 19:28
    
Nice, thanks. I got it working with this. When I added it to customer_ids however, I got access violations. I'm guessing I might have done something else wrong. But I'm curious, what is the danger of leaving it as is if I am getting the correct answer? –  vikingsfan19 Jan 22 '13 at 22:15
    
@vikingsfan19 Happy to help. Can I see the code at the line where you're getting an access violtation? Also, the danger of leaving the code as it was is that when you realloc and the location of the allocated memory decides it needs to change, you now have a lingering pointer that's pointing to trash data and once the function ends, if you didn't use a pointer to a pointer, that allocated memory at the new location will just be floating around, un-handled. (AKA a memory leak) –  Gunther Fox Jan 22 '13 at 22:50
    
Ah, actually I figured it out. I just missed a spot. –  vikingsfan19 Jan 23 '13 at 21:01

You seem a bit confused how to return memory from a function.

if you have a function that looks like this

void foo(int a);

you can not change a inside of foo, foo only gets a copy of a.

void foo(int *a);

otoh gives foo the address of a, i.e. "i know where you live" it lets you change what a points to. if a points to an array then you can change the contents of that array, if a points to a single integer you can change that.

void foo(int **a);

lets you change not only what a points to, but also where it points. so if you want a to point to somewhere else you can. this is what you need in your function, if you do a malloc/calloc/realloc in your function to return the result you need this

share|improve this answer
    
So the way I was trying to do it essentially was like sending a copy of the array? Is that why the extra * is necessary? –  vikingsfan19 Jan 22 '13 at 22:13
    
fill_arrays(int *customer_count,.. would never allow you to change the size of customer_count because realloc creates a new block in memory –  CyberSpock Jan 23 '13 at 6:32

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