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I could not get the WinBUGS code below to work. It works for normal priors, but not for uniform priors. The error message that appears after I click compile is array index is greater than array upper bound for age. What does that mean? Can any one please help me work the code below please?

model
{
for (i in 1:n) {
# Linear regression on logit
logit(p[i]) <- alpha + b.sex*sex[i] + b.age*age[i]
# Likelihood function for each data point
frac[i] ~ dbern(p[i])
}
alpha ~ dunif(0, 1) # Prior for intercept
b.sex ~ dunif(0, 1) # Prior for slope of sex
b.age ~ dunif(0, 1) # Prior for slope of age
}
Data
list(sex=c(1, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0,     1,
1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 0, 0, 1, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 1,     1, 0,
0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 1,      1, 1,
0, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1),
age= c(69, 57, 61, 60, 69, 74, 63, 68, 64, 53, 60, 58, 79, 56, 53, 74, 56, 76, 72,
56, 66, 52, 77, 70, 69, 76, 72, 53, 69, 59, 73, 77, 55, 77, 68, 62, 56, 68, 70, 60,
57, 51, 51, 63, 57, 80, 52, 65, 72, 80, 73, 76, 79, 66, 51, 76, 75, 66, 75, 78, 70,
67, 51, 70, 71, 71, 74, 74, 60, 58, 55, 61, 65, 52, 68, 75, 52, 53, 70),
frac=c(1, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1,        0,
1, 0, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1,        1, 1,
1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1,      1, 1,
1, 0, 1, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 1),
n=100)
Initial Values
list(alpha=0.5, b.sex=0.5, b.age=0.5)
share|improve this question
    
This is very vague description of your problem. You should be more specific about why it doesn't work. Anyways, I don't see any uniform priors in your code - only normal. –  TMS Jan 22 '13 at 20:54
    
@Tomas, my apologies. I have edited the question. What would you suggest in this case? –  Günal Jan 22 '13 at 21:48
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1 Answer 1

Oh, that's clear. WinBUGS says array index is greater than array upper bound for age. That clearly hints an error -> I see you have n = 100 and the age list is not long enough:

> your_list <- list(...)
> str(your_list)
List of 4
 $ sex : num [1:100] 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 ...
 $ age : num [1:79] 69 57 61 60 69 74 63 68 64 53 ...
 $ frac: num [1:100] 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 ...
 $ n   : num 100

Anyways, I wouldn't use uniform prior here; unless you actually know what you are doing, I would recommend flat normal, like dnorm(0, 1.0E-10) or so. You should also allow negative values for the coefficients. The "null hypothesis" normally is that the coefficient is zero, so for the mean value of the posterior distribution of the coefficient to be zero, you should "allow it some space from both sides" (intuitivelly said).

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for your comment. Actually, the only reason why I am using a Bayesian approach is to obtain positive regression coefficients. What can be done to do so? Normal priors work, but uniform ones don't. Any suggestions to handle this? –  Günal Jan 23 '13 at 11:30
    
I used dbeta(1,1) instead of dunif(0,1) because as far as I know they are equal. Is that right? Anyways, it works now. Would that make any difference at all in the output. Also, I am wondering why beta priors work, but uniform priors don't. –  Günal Jan 23 '13 at 12:25
    
@Edo, You mentioned it didn't work because of indices, so my advice should help then! –  TMS Jan 23 '13 at 16:07
    
yes it works now :) Thanks. So, what do you think of the difference between U[0,1] and Beta(1,1). Would it make any difference to use either of them? –  Günal Jan 23 '13 at 16:25
    
@Edo, great! I don't see any difference between the two distributions. The only difference may be that Beta is more difficult to compute. If you found something weird about these two distributions in WinBUGS, I suggest you establish a new question at stats.stackexchange.com and report it with more detail. –  TMS Jan 23 '13 at 17:01
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