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Is there any way to do arithmetical operations with long(very) integers? How to add them and get square of them? Can I do this on Windows CMD and Bash? Thank you!

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4 Answers 4

In bash you can use bc. Here link http://www.gnu.org/software/bc/manual/html_mono/bc.html

For my version ( bc 1.06.95 ):

1) The limit on the number of characters in a string ( in expression ) : 2147483647
2) The limit on value of the exponent : 2147483647

For example:

echo "2^2" | bc - calculates 2 in power 2

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Windows CMD has the following limitations

There is a severe limitation in batch math: it can only handle 32-bit integers. (−2,147,483,648 to +2,147,483,647)

In Windows NT 4 and possibly 2000, the limitation is even worse: it can only handle unsigned 32-bit integers. (0 to 4,294,967,295)

Source: http://www.robvanderwoude.com/battech_math.php

However, see the Workarounds section in that source above!

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Assuming CMD is umbrella term for command line and recent version of Windows (Win 7+, optional & may be installed on XP), powershell is easiest to use. To get sum squared, you can just do:
powershell [math]::sqrt(2+2)

Powershell will auto adjust data type for you, for very big numbers it will use either int64 or Decimal (int128) automatically. You may try this with different values to see it: powershell (your_value_here).gettype().name

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I always use scala for that, but it might be overkill. And it is a little bit slow, if you only want to evaluate one expression, instead staying in its REPL mode:

$ scala -e 'println (BigInt("12345056560232232323232323").pow(17))'
3592381313781713347169811993632501191758657981889928930682479036490714840370007545514882170730018303552133089619990376179050098738641961735841902033891344811425818404146852596771837724556848714975175935703785905563690781027522348495906322533140231903044769974928750539681481346060497468038154440312144677922886371790280816174167119667432789145549865983687361599563492624405727749237730761069822040101542802077317687934387891203

Or pari:

$ echo "12345056560232232323232323^17" | gp -q
3592381313781713347169811993632501191758657981889928930682479036490714840370007545514882170730018303552133089619990376179050098738641961735841902033891344811425818404146852596771837724556848714975175935703785905563690781027522348495906322533140231903044769974928750539681481346060497468038154440312144677922886371790280816174167119667432789145549865983687361599563492624405727749237730761069822040101542802077317687934387891203
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