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I was trying to write some code for doing functional-style creation of sequences. I wrote one function, range(a, b), which returns an object that you can iterate over, foreach-style, to go through the numbers a, a + 1, ..., b - 1. Then I wrote another function, map(f, t), which returns another iterable object where each element in the sequence is the result of calling f with the corresponding element of the iterable object t.

This works as expected if I compile using -O1 or lower; with -O2 or higher, my foreach loop (in main at the bottom) gets completely optimised away and nothing is printed. Why does this happen, what have I done wrong? Here's my code:

template<typename T>
struct _range {
    T a;
    T b;

    _range(T a, T b):
        a(a),
        b(b)
    {
    }

    struct iterator {
        T it;

        iterator(T it):
            it(it)
        {
        }

        bool operator!=(const iterator &other) const
        {
            return it != other.it;
        }

        void operator++()
        {
            ++it;
        }

        T operator*() const
        {
            return it;
        }
    };

    iterator begin() const
    {
        return iterator(a);
    }

    iterator end() const
    {
        return iterator(b);
    }
};

template<typename T>
_range<T> range(const T a, const T b)
{
    return _range<T>(a, b);
}

template<typename F, typename T>
struct _map {
    const F &f;
    const T &t;

    _map(const F &f, const T &t):
        f(f),
        t(t)
    {
    }

    struct iterator {
        const F &f;
        typename T::iterator it;

        iterator(const F &f, typename T::iterator it):
            f(f),
            it(it)
        {
        }

        bool operator!=(const iterator &other) const
        {
            return it != other.it;
        }

        void operator++()
        {
            ++it;
        }

        int operator*() const
        {
            return f(*it);
        }
    };

    iterator begin() const
    {
        return iterator(f, t.begin());
    }

    iterator end() const
    {
        return iterator(f, t.end());
    }
};

template<typename F, typename T>
_map<F, T> map(const F &f, const T &t)
{
    return _map<F, T>(f, t);
}

#include <algorithm>
#include <cstdio>

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    for (int i: map([] (int x) { return 3 * x; }, range(-4, 5)))
        printf("%d\n", i);

    return 0;
}
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Maybe a bug? With Clang++, it works fine with both at the O1 and O2 optimization levels. –  user529758 Jan 22 '13 at 20:26
7  
Try having _map store its members by value rather than storing const refs. (I suspect your range object is being destroyed earlier than you had hoped.) –  ildjarn Jan 22 '13 at 20:40
3  
i believe @ildjarn got it right: the temporary is forced to live as long as the constant reference it is bound to is alive. the reference it is bound to is the argument of map's constructor. when the constructor returns, the reference goes out of scope and the temporary gets destroyed. –  Andy Prowl Jan 22 '13 at 20:45
    
Yes, very nice, thanks! Please create an answer? –  Vegard Jan 22 '13 at 20:52

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Summarizing the existing comments:

range(-4, 5) creates a temporary, and (in most cases) temporaries only live until the end of the full-expression in which they are created. So in your case, the returned _range object is valid during the construction of the _map, but as soon as said _map is returned from map, the full-expression ends and the _range object is destroyed.

That said, because _map holds the arguments passed to its constructor by const ref rather than by value, this means that by the time the range-based for begins executing, your _map::t is already a dangling reference – classic undefined behavior.

To fix this, simply have _map store its data members by value.

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