Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In most code that I come across, they explicitly convert an int or other number to a string while using String.Format(), although from what I've noticed it is not necessary. Is there something I'm missing which requires explicit conversion of a number to a string before using it as a string?

Explicit:

int i = 13;
string example = String.Format("If a Friday lands on the {0}th of the month, it is generally considered to be an unlucky day!",
                               i.ToString());

Which produces example as: "If a Friday lands on the 13th of the month, it is generally considered to be an unlucky day!"

Non-explicit:

int i = 13;
string example = String.Format("If a Friday lands on the {0}th of the month, it is generally considered to be an unlucky day!",
                                i);

Which produces example as: "If a Friday lands on the 13th of the month, it is generally considered to be an unlucky day!" (the same as explicitly converting). So why do the majority of coders I see do this?

share|improve this question
4  
You've got it backwards. Calling ToString() is explicitly converting i to a string. Passing i directly to Format() means that the conversion happens implicitly. –  cdhowie Jan 22 '13 at 20:25
    
@cdhowie - Thank you for the clarification. –  Ben Record Jan 22 '13 at 20:26
    
Where have you been looking? It's highly unusual to see calls to ToString() being applied to arguments to String.Format(). –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jan 22 '13 at 20:26

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

If you use an implicit conversion, the int is boxed to object first. That's a tiny performance hit, but one which some people seem to think is important, and may explain the code.

Indeed, Jeffrey Richter wrote about this (encouraging the use of this sort of thing) in his otherwise-excellent CLR via C#. It irritated me enough that I blogged about it :)

Of course in some places, boxing may be relevant - but given that string.Format needs to walk the format string and do all kinds of other things, I wouldn't expect it to be significant here... and that's before you consider what you're going to do with the string next :)

share|improve this answer
    
At the cost of forfeiting the ability to specify numeric formatting within the String.Format argument, too. (e.g. {0:C} within the format string now becomes i.ToString("C") within the argument list). –  Brad Christie Jan 22 '13 at 20:28
    
@BradChristie: Absolutely. It's crazy in various ways. Oh well. –  Jon Skeet Jan 22 '13 at 20:28

Because we are used to the rules and you'd better be too. String.Format() is a clever method, every method is not. remember that String.Format() takes objects so you don't need to convert, however if you do you are still sending an object.

share|improve this answer

I really don't see a reason to do this. Since String.Format() does this already, as you point out, it is more compact and IMO easier to read if you just let String.Format() take care of it.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.