Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have two objects of same type with different values:

    public class Itemi
    {
    public Itemi()
    {

    }

    public int Prop1Min { get; set; }
    public int Prop1Max { get; set; }

    public int Prop2Min { get; set; }
    public int Prop2Max { get; set; }

    public int Prop3Min { get; set; }
    public int Prop3Max { get; set; }
    ...................................
    public int Prop25Min { get; set; }
    public int Prop25Max { get; set; }

    }

Now I instantiate two objects of this type and add some values to their properties.

Itemi myItem1 = new Itemi();

myItem1.Prop1Min = 1;
myItem1.Prop1Max = 4;

myItem1.Prop2Min = 2;
myItem1.Prop2Max = 4;

myItem1.Prop3Min = -1;
myItem1.Prop3Max = 5;

.............................

myItem1.Prop25Min = 1;
myItem1.Prop25Max = 5;

Itemi myItem2 = new Itemi();

myItem2.Prop1Min = 1;
myItem2.Prop1Max = 5;

myItem2.Prop2Min = -10;
myItem2.Prop2Max = 3;

myItem2.Prop3Min = 0;
myItem2.Prop3Max = 2;

................................

myItem2.Prop25Min = 3;
myItem2.Prop25Max = 6;

What is the best and fastest way to do this comparison:

  • take each properties from myItem1 and check if values from Prop1-25 Min and Max are within the range values of myItem2 Prop1-25 Min and Max

Example:

   myItem1.Prop1Min = 1
   myItem1.Prop1Max = 4

   myItem2.Prop1Min = 1
   myItem2.Prop1Max = 5

this is True because mtItem1 Prop1 min and max are within the range of myItem2 min and max.

the condition should be AND in between all properties so in the end after we check all 25 properties if all of them are within the range of the second object we return true.

Is there a fast way to do this using Linq or other algorithm except the traditional if-else?

share|improve this question
8  
Do you really need 50 separate properties, rather than 2 properties, each of which is a collection? –  Jon Skeet Jan 22 '13 at 20:30
3  
Also it's nice to create Range object to hold Min and Max values –  Sergey Berezovskiy Jan 22 '13 at 20:31
2  
You problem isn't performace. –  Ondrej Tucny Jan 22 '13 at 20:33
1  
@DavidDury OMG are you planning to deploy this to end users? –  HighCore Jan 22 '13 at 20:40
1  
@DavidDury if this is your "data model", I can only image what the rest of the application code looks like... –  HighCore Jan 22 '13 at 20:46

4 Answers 4

I would refactor the properties to be more along the lines of:

public class Item
{
    public List<Range> Ranges { get; set; }
}

public class Range
{
    public int Min { get; set; }
    public int Max { get; set; }
}

Then your comparison method could be:

if (myItem1.Ranges.Count != myItem2.Ranges.Count)
{
    return false;
}

for (int i = 0; i < myItem1.Ranges.Count; i++)
{
    if (myItem1.Ranges[i].Min < myItem2.Ranges[i].Min ||
        myItem1.Ranges[i].Max > myItem2.Ranges[i].Max)
    {
        return false;
    }
}        
return true;

Otherwise you will have to use Reflection, which is anything but fast.

share|improve this answer
    
The lack of LINQ in your solution is disappointing. –  Servy Jan 22 '13 at 20:59
    
@Servy: I added a LINQ solution :) –  Sebastian Negraszus Jan 23 '13 at 9:06
    
@Servy: LINQ is a great tool. Like with any tool, it's important to know when (and when not) to use it. You wouldn't use a hammer to drive a screw. –  Ginosaji Jan 23 '13 at 18:35
    
@Ginosaji So you think LINQ is not an appropriate tool to use in solving this problem? I strongly disagree. Your for loop can be easily refactored to a call to Zip and All (as demonstrated by Sebastian's answer), which will make it shorter and (arguably) clearer. It would not, in any way, be an inappropriate tool for the job. If you're not aware of the capabilities of LINQ and how to use it, you might consider not answering questions specifically asking how to code a solution in LINQ (which is the case here). –  Servy Jan 23 '13 at 18:37
    
@Servy: As demonstrated in Sebastian's answer, I would indeed say that LINQ only serves to obscure the intent in this situation. I'm well aware of the capabilities of LINQ, and I would advise against using LINQ only for the sake of using LINQ. Also, despite the tag, nothing in the phrasing of this question precludes non-LINQ solutions. –  Ginosaji Jan 23 '13 at 18:48

Linq is using standart statements like if...then, for each and other, there is no magic :)

If the final goal only to compare, without needing to say, which properties are not in the range, then you not need to check them all, on the first unequals you can end checking.

Because you have so much properties, you must think about saving it in Dictionary, or List, for example. Or to use dynamic properties (ITypedList), if it will use for binding.

share|improve this answer

You really should do something like Ginosaji proposed.

But if you want to go with your current data model, here is how I would solve it. Happy typing. :)

public static bool RangeIsContained(int outerMin, int outerMax, int innerMin, int innerMax)
{
    return (outerMin <= innerMin && outerMax >= innerMax);
}

public bool IsContained(Itemi outer, Itemi inner)
{
    return RangeIsContained(outer.Prop1Min, outer.Prop1Max, inner.Prop1Min, inner.Prop1Max)
        && RangeIsContained(outer.Prop2Min, outer.Prop2Max, inner.Prop2Min, inner.Prop2Max)
        // ...
        && RangeIsContained(outer.Prop25Min, outer.Prop25Max, inner.Prop25Min, inner.Prop25Max);
}

With your data model this is basically the only way to go except for reflection (slow!). LINQ cannot help you because your data is not enumerable.

share|improve this answer

For the sake of completeness, here is a LINQ solution (but it's less performant and less readable than Ginosaji's solution!)

public class Range
{
    public int Min { get; set; }
    public int Max { get; set; }

    public static bool IsContained(Range super, Range sub)
    {
        return super.Min <= sub.Min
            && super.Max >= sub.Max;
    }
}

public class Itemi
{
    public Itemi()
    {
        properties = new Range[25];
        for (int i = 0; i < properties.Length; i++)
        {
            properties[i] = new Range();
        }
    }

    private Range[] properties;

    public IEnumerable<Range> Properties { get { return properties; } }

    public static bool IsContained(Itemi super, Itemi sub)
    {
        return super.properties
            .Zip(sub.properties, (first, second) => Tuple.Create(first, second))
            .All((entry) => Range.IsContained(entry.Item1, entry.Item2));
    }

    public Range Prop1 
    { 
        get { return properties[0]; }
        set { properties[0] = value; }
    }

    public Range Prop2
    {
        get { return properties[1]; }
        set { properties[1] = value; }
    }

    // ...
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.